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Vol 2 - May 2015 Partnership for Tomorrow City of Greer Acknowledgments Thank you to the Partnership for Tomorrow Board of Directors PFT contributors and Mayor and City Council of the City of Greer for their generous financial support of this project. The Greer Community Master Plan is the direct result of a collaborative effort between the Partnership for Tomorrow and the City of Greer. We extend our sincere appreciation to the residents business owners elected officials and stakeholders who participated in the planning process and guided the development of this plan. Everyones time input and energy are greatly appreciated. Oversight Committee Consultant Team Arnett Muldrow Associates Tripp Muldrow Langley Associates Architects David Langley Craig Gaulden Davis Ed Zeigler Elizabeth Adams Russ Braasch Rick Danner Skip Davenport Reno Deaton Ed Driggers Dave Edwards Roberta Evans Sam Floyd Kelly Long John Mansure Nick Nicholson Jr. Mark Owens Glenn Pace Mike Sell April Staggs Scott Stevens Jeff Tuttle Denise Vandenberghe Larry Wilson City of Greer Braasch Building Group Mayor City of Greer DD Motors Greer Development Corporation City of Greer Chairman GSP Airport BMW Partnership for Tomorrow TD Bank Greer Memorial Hospital Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Greater Greer Chamber of Commerce City of Greer City of Greer Certus Bank Events at the Davenport Greer Commission of Public Works Wild Ace Partnership for Tomorrow Kimley-Horn Stephen Stansbery Eric Bosman Jonathan Whitehurst Jessica Choi Matt Horton Jessica Rossi Marsha Jenkins Cody Zanni Community Initiatives Preferred Growth Strategy Focus Areas Framework Plans Action Plan 1 2 3 4 5 CHAPTER 1 31 51 89 129 Community Initiatives 1 Introduction Our Community Previous Planning Efforts Our Engagement Our Initiatives Partnership for Tomorrow The Partnership for Tomorrow PFT was formed in 1998 by a concerned group of business civic government and community leaders to address the issues and concerns related to the growth of the Greater Greer community and the opportunities it would bring to the area. The mission of the PFT is to provide the City of Greer and surrounding areas with the resources necessary to address a variety of issues that will benefit our community and make Greer a better place to live and work. The Partnership for Tomorrow commissioned the Greer Community Master Plan as the next step toward making Greer an even better place to live work and invest. The planning efforts goals are to Create a communitywide vision to guide growth and development Improve the stability physical condition and economic well-being of the city Make Greer a more livable and sustainable community of choice between now and 2030 G r e e r Community Master Plan 1 Greers location enviable transportation infrastructure and abundance of land have made it one of the fastest growing cities in South Carolina over the past decade. These same elements have positioned the city for continued growth during the foreseeable horizon. But while growth at such as a scale breeds opportunity it also demands a purposeful plan for the futurea plan that emerges from a visioning process but yields an actionable strategy grounded in foreseeable economic realities. The Partnership for Tomorrow PFT a community initiative for the future of Greer commissioned the Greer Community Master Plan as the next step toward fulfilling their mission of providing the City of Greer and surrounding areas with the resources necessary to address a variety of issues that will benefit our community and make Greer a better place to live work and invest. Introduction May 2015 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 2 The planning process began in early 2014 with an exploration of existing conditions and a multi-faceted outreach campaign. The approach was simple to create a strategy that achieves desirable results over the next 15 years we must understand our successes and challenges since the original plan was put in place in 1999. It also was critical to take a community snapshot to reassess the vision and priorities expressed by the community and its leadership. Our Process COMMUNITYOUTREACHPROCESS PlanGreer.com MetroQuest Survey Oversight Committee Meeting 12214 Theme Committee Work Session 5714 Community Workshop 1 61214 PFT Work Session 71514 Oversight Committee Meeting 92314 Design Workshop 102114 Community Workshop 2 111814 Oversight Committee Meeting 12715 Oversight Committee Meeting 31715 Open House 42315 Community Celebration 52815 Visioning Growth Strategy Focus Areas Framework Plans Action Plan Roll Out The Greer Community Master Plan helps us achieve success against a set of community initiatives that are clear relatable and important to city leaders and residents. The underlying philosophy was based on the belief that planning should be done by community leaders citizens and stakeholders. Participants not only should value the process and support the outcome but also have a clear understanding of how to execute and achieve desired results. The process for the Greer Community Master Plan was organized around five overlapping elements and concluded with the roll out of the plan G r e e r Community Master Plan 3 Greers location in the region and the state is an asset. Its a community that straddles Greenville and Spartanburg Counties has excellent access to highway and rail corridors hosts the regions international airport and serves as a hub of manufacturing. The communitys changing demographics reflect its location and the quality of life current residents enjoy. Today Greer is growing getting younger and becoming better educated and more affluent. In some respects the city is following in the trend of the larger region. In others the citys ideal location enviable quality of life and micro-economy are setting the pace. Our Community The study area for the Greer Community Master Plan includes the city itself as well as some of the unincorporated portions of Greenville and Spartanburg Counties. The intent is not to establish a regulatory document as part of the master planning process but rather to provide a growth strategy that should be referenced and upheld as incremental decisions are made. The study area covers a contiguous area from north of Lake Robinson to SC 296 in the Golden Box area. May 2015 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 4 G r e e r Community Master Plan 2000 57000 people 79000 2015 people 100000 2030 people 5 What it means A growing population creates more opportunities to enhance the quality of life but places increased demands on services and infrastructure. Because retail follows rooftops Greers growth is leading to new higher-end retail opportunities. Greer is Growing Since 2000 the Greer area has grown 38.5 more than twice the pace of the Greenville-Spartanburg Combined Statistical Area CSA. Greer continues to attract people and businesses drawn to its sense of place location in the region and abundance of jobs. And Greers growth is going to continue. Within the next 15 years our community should be prepared to accomodate a population the exceeds 100000. 22000 New people in the study area Since2000 2.4 Annual growth rate in the Greer area 8500 New households in the study area 1.1 Annual growth rate in the Greenville-Spartanburg CSA Note 2000 - 2014 ESRI Trend May 2015 What it means In general younger people place more emphasis on active lifestyles cultural resources and access to urban amenities even if they do not actually live downtown. Potential employers also are attracted to areas with younger vibrant workforces. CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 6 Greer is Getting Younger The median age in the Greer area is increasing at a much slower rate than the region from 37.1 in 2000 to 38.1 in 2014. This trend shows the influx of young families in Greer is offsetting regional state and national trends of an aging population due to the Baby Boomer generation. 1.0 2.7 3.2 2.9 Greenville- Spartanburg Greer Study Area South Carolina United States Note 2000 - 2014 ESRI Trend Increase in Median Age 2000-2014 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 Population 2000 2014 2 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 Population 2000 2014 Note 2000 - 2014 ESRI Trend Population Growth by Age 2000-2014 G r e e r Community Master Plan 2000 Median Household Income 2014 Median Household Income 45556 51534 7 What it means Having an educated trained workforce helps attract potential employers. These employers in turn inject wealth back into the community. Greer is Becoming Better Educated and More Affluent The communitys improving education status is directly influencing its rise in income. In 2014 nearly a third of the population held a bachelors degree or higher. From 2000 to 2014 the median household income increased by 13 to 51534. Greer Community Master Plan Community Assessment WHAT WE KNOWSeptember 2014 Becoming Better Educated and More Affluent The communitys improving education status is directly inuencing its rise in income. In 2014 nearly a third of the population held a bachelors degree or higher. From 2000 to 2014 the median household income increased by 13 percent to 51534. Greers Role in the Regional Economy The nearly 35000 jobs in the study area make up 6.6 percent of the regional base. Greers position in the region inuenced by its location on I-85 and proximity to BMW the airport and the inland porthas made it a popular destination for a variety of industries. Growth measured in Wholesale Trade Manufacturing and Transportation and Warehousing is notable given the decline in these sectors on a regional scale. 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 45556 51534 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 2000 2014 MedianHouseholdIncome Greer Study Area Greer Study Area Greenville-Spartanburg CSA 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 Greer Study Area Greenville-Spartanburg CSA Note 2000 - 2014 ESRI Trend What it means Having an educated trained workforce helps attract potential employers. These employers in turn inject wealth back into the community. Associates Degree May 2015 What it means Having a diverse economy allows Greer to continue to be a viable place to live. People want to live closer to where they work which creates a robust employment base that enables the community to grow remain young and become more affluent. 4 Greer Community Master Plan Community Assessment WHAT WE KNOWSeptember 2014 Becoming Better Educated and More Affluent The communitys improving education status is directly inuencing its rise in income. In 2014 nearly a third of the population held a bachelors degree or higher. From 2000 to 2014 the median household income increased by 13 percent to 51534. Greers Role in the Regional Economy The nearly 35000 jobs in the study area make up 6.6 percent of the regional base. Greers position in the region inuenced by its location on I-85 and proximity to BMW the airport and the inland porthas made it a popular destination for a variety of industries. Growth measured in Wholesale Trade Manufacturing and Transportation and Warehousing is notable given the decline in these sectors on a regional scale. 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 45556 51534 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 2000 2014 MedianHouseholdIncome Greer Study Area Greer Study Area Greenville-Spartanburg CSA 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 Overall share 6.6 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 8 Greer has a Growing and Diversifying Economy The nearly 35000 jobs in the study area make up 6.6 of the regional base. Greers position in the region influenced by its location on I-85 and proximity to BMW the airport and the inland porthas made it a popular destination for a variety of industries. Growth measured in wholesale trade manufacturing and transportation and warehousing is notable given the decline in these sectors on a regional scale. Note 2000 - 2014 ESRI Trend Greers Share of Regional Economy 2013-2014 G r e e r Community Master Plan 9 In 2013 the City of Greer initiated the development of a strategic plan. The Strategic Plan serves as a reference document to help develop departmental work plans measure progress and success and ensure the City of Greer is doing what it needs to be doing to keep the city operating above the status quo. The plan consists of a vision statement a mission statement strategic initiatives goals and tasks and performance indicators develop implement and evaluate. A high-level review of existing planning efforts and policies influencing growth transportation business recruitment and environmental concerns within the study area offered insight into what already is in motion as well as the forces that influence the location and form of development. A focus of the review was identifying vision statements guiding principles and goals that could help shape the direction of the Greer Community Master Plan. Previous Planning Efforts Mission Statement Provide open and honest government representative of all its citizens. Ensure fiscal responsibility of the publics money through cost-effective services. Exercise environmentally sound and prudent management of growth and development to increase employment opportunity provide available housing offer abundant recreation and preserve the historic charm of the city. Promote artistic athletic academic and social values through actions and words. 2013 Greer Strategic Plan Exhibit 2-4 Plan view of the Five Points Intersection May 2015 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 10 Vision Statement The City of Greers vision is to deliver effective services to provide a quality of life that makes the City of Greer a great place to live work and play. Strategic Initiatives Efficient and Effective Public Services Council is committed to providing programs and services to the community in the most efficient and cost-effective manner possible without sacrificing responsiveness and quality. Responsible Growth Management and Development Council is committed to maintaining and developing healthy communities and sustainable neighborhoods to foster economic and social stability provide for the safety and welfare of residents provide affordable housing and ensure access to employment education recreation and public services. Economic Development Council supports efforts to develop effective economic development strategies that will position the city to take advantage of current and future economic conditions by identifying key opportunities for recruitment of businesses industries and services that provide jobs and meet the needs of the community. Quality of Life Council recognizes that an enhanced quality of life is essential to attract visitors and residents to the city. To that end council supports programs services and activities that enhance recreation facilities and amenities and provide the community with a sense of place that define Greer as a great place to live work and play. Image Partnership for Tomorrow Master Plan for Greer South Carolina 1999 G r e e r Community Master Plan Exhib 11 The purpose of the 1999 plan was to develop a long-term vision for the community. It focused on three strategic areas. Community and stakeholder outreach was a pillar of the plan. It concludes with an implementation strategy and action plan centered on the three strategic areas. 1999 Greer Master Plan Strategic Areas Downtown Greer The emphasis on downtown served three purposes positioning existing businesses for success identifying opportunities for new investment and establishing a positive image for the entire community. Civic Complex The master plans focus on the civic complex was realized and is a lasting legacy of the plan. The continued investment within and adjacent to the complex sets the stage for further consideration of the communitys core as part of the Greer Community Master Plan. Highway 101 Corridor The 1999 plan was completed just a few years after the construction of the BMW manufacturing complex in 1992. The significant impact of the 1200-acre facility on the surrounding area was addressed in the 1999 plan. Exhibit 2-1 Existing conditions map of Downtown Greer May 2015 bit 3-3 Perspective sketch of the Greer Commons Complex CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 12 Goals TransportationMobility Strengthen long-term transportation planning Improve bicycle and pedestrian facilities Improve overall traffic conditions Expand bus services Housing Safe affordable housing and communities Revitalize the citys core neighborhoods Encourage traditional neighborhood development Cultural Resources Develop and market the historical aspects of the City of Greer Host festivals and event in downtown area Support the Greer heritage museum Promote community preservation planning Economic Development Continue to develop the downtown as a unique commercial center for the community Continue to develop a marketable identity for Greer Continue to develop a high-quality multi- national and diversified industrial and commercial economic base Land Use Create mixed-use pedestrian-friendly development The City Center as a community focal point Well-connected neighborhood activity centers Promote adaptive reuse of vacant structures Favor clustered commercial development as opposed to strip commercial development Enhance Parks and Open Space Develop strategies to implement Greers Parks and Recreation StrategicMaster Plan Image Partnership for Tomorrow Master Plan for Greer South Carolina 1999 2010 Greer Comprehensive Plan The 2010 Comprehensive Plan a state requirement for local governments that regulate land use addresses growth and development planning needs through 2020. The plan with input from residents business leaders and public officials evaluates core planning elements creates a vision and defines the implementation strategies necessary to attain the vision. Elected officials City staff Residents Business owners Major employers Neighborhood advocates Economic development officials Real estate professionals Planning commission Metropolitan Planning Organizations Board of Architectural Review Police fire and rescue officials Environmental groups Utility providers Museum board members Agency representatives Key interest groups targeted and invited to participate in outreach activities include G r e e r Community Master Plan 13 Creating a community vision is a planning step that should not be taken lightly. It requires a thoughtful approach to engaging the community and empowering stakeholders. Community engagement for the Greer Community Master Plan encouraged aspirational planning while understanding why decisions were made. In doing so three basic questions were asked What does Greer want to be What steps will be required for Greer to be successful How will we measure and what should we anticipate as a result of Greers success Asking these questions allowed the visioning process to yield a set of desired outcomes and action items that align with community values. The questions were asked in a variety of ways at numerous events during the visioning phase. These events included an Oversight Committee Meeting January 2014 a Theme Committee Work Session May 2014 a MetroQuest Online Interactive Survey May to August 2014 and a Community Workshop June 2014. Our Engagement May 2015 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 14 What are we proud of Perception people ask how we have achieved so much Downtown Quality of life Desirable place to be especially for young families Parks and open space Diversity commerce population ideas What are our challenges Perception continuing the momentum Addressing quality of life needs for a broader population Branding determining then broadcasting Greers brand Preparing for growth Marketing to a broader audience narrow focus but global reach Leveraging investments Establishing our place in the region What places should we focus on Center city especially housing and connectivity Wade Hampton Boulevard Victor Mill I-85 Interchanges SC 101 SC 290 South of I-85 North of 29 Railroads What does downtown need Understanding the limits What is downtown Retail mix Grocery store Parking quantity and location right size Pedestrians Living space including hotel Housing redevelopment or new The Project Oversight Committee which includes the PFT and other stakeholders weighed in at major milestones refined concepts and confirmed direction toward final recommendations. At its first meeting the committee discussed issues and opportunities. Oversight Committee Meeting January 22 2014 G r e e r Community Master Plan 15 The Theme Committee Work Sessions were the first major visioning event for the master plan. On this day more than 40 stakeholders tackled issues specific to five planning themes Economic Development Transportation and Mobility Culture Art and Historic Resources Parks and Open Space Central Business District During the first half of the work session attendees split into two groups to discuss game changers and participate in a Thought Wall exercise. During the second half attendees focused on the central business district. The theme committee activities helped define the importance of each element and its influence on community vitality. Participants also identified external influences beyond the control of Greer. Theme Committee Work Session May 7 2014 Game Changers Game changers can significantly shift the direction of our community. They can occur instantly or evolve over time and they can provide opportunities or create obstacles. What are Greers Game Changers Demographic shifts Two counties with different goals Economy and employers Education and workforce meeting expectations of potential employers Transportation funding States role in economic development How do they affect us Need enhanced partnerships Must consider Greers location and the airport as growth strategies are developed Must identify socially and geographically what it means to live in Greer Need to leverage BMW and the inland port to enhance our brand Need to attract hotels to Greer May 2015 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 16 Thought Wall This exercise asked participants to write five individual thoughts on paper color- coded according to their theme committee. One sheet was reserved for them to note their most important thought. Participants placed their thoughts on a wall under two broad categories Opportunities or Constraints. The exercise created more than 130 individual thoughts related to the planning themes. The Partnership for Tomorrow Kimley-Horn 10 Greer Community Master Plan Community Assessment WHAT WE HEARDSeptember 2014 Thought Wall The Thought Wall exercise required participants to write five thoughts on individual sheets of paper color- coded according to their theme committee. One sheet was reserved for them to note their most important thought. Participants were then asked to place their thoughts on a wall under two broad categories Opportunities or Constraints. The result was a visual representation of the positive and negative features in Greer. The exercise also provided more than 130 individual thoughts related to the planning themes. Policies that integrate transportation land use Walking and biking paths Infrastructure improvements Interconnected street network downtown Regional cooperation for economic development infrastructure and education US 29 Lack of interconnected multimodal options within Greer and between neighboring communities Lack of mixed-use walkable communities Walking and biking trails that connect destinations Unique recreation opportunities Planned passive parks and open space as growth occurs Blueways and greenways Parks that host events and bring people here Integrate parks with a revised bicycle and pedestrian plan Marketing current parks Availability of land and funds Neighborhood culture mill villages core neighborhoods Tourism Greer Heritage Museum Interactive art sculptural playground Potential public art program and Arts District Mixing arts and history hip and historic Public opinion Access to multiple modes of distribution Inland port airport and BMW Branding Greer as a recognizable destination Two major hospital systems Attracting millennials live work and play Brand visibility Workforce training State incentives Perception Who are we Where are we Multiple counties Opportunities Constraints Transportation andMobility ParksandOpenSpace CultureArtand HistoricResources Economic Development G r e e r Community Master Plan Successes City Park and the Cannon Centre City Hall and Courthouse Restaurants Residentialliving opportunities downtown Trade Street streetscape and landscaping Private business attraction and revitalization Creating a sense of destination Small town feel and historic character Branding and marketing Greer Positive perception of residents and visitors Strong leadership Opportunity for events Greer Heritage Museum Childrens Theater Fire protection and safety Challenges Shortage of downtown parking Building vacanciesempty storefronts Lack of residential development Real estate market Railroad creates a barrier to downtown development Lack of family-friendly businesses extended hours Lack of connectivity to downtown neighborhoods Lack of transportation choices Lack of retail anchor Need to attract hotels to Greer 17 In five groups attendees were asked to 1. Note the success stories for Downtown Greer since the 1999 Greer Station Master Plan 2. Identify challenges the downtown area still faces. May 2015 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 18 Central Business District Preserve or Enhance In the mapping exercise participants used colored dots to identify specific locations in the downtown area that should be preserved red dots or redeveloped green dots. The results highlighted the need to preserve the area bounded by Main Street Poinsett Street and Randall Street. The groups selected areas around the core for positive change or redevelopment in particular Main Street Cannon Street and the industrial corridor between the two railroad tracks north of Moore Street. G r e e r Community Master Plan 19 MetroQuest Online Interactive Survey May-August 2014 To broaden the range of perspectives an interactive web-based questionnaire was launched and nearly 500 individuals participated between May and August 2014. The customized survey yielded a robust dataset of community preferences opinions and issues that ultimately contributed to the development of alternative growth strategies. 486 Responses 319 Written Comments 1951 Locations Noted for Households Jobs or Parks 13579 Individual Data Points The Partnership for Tomorrow Kimley 500 individuals participated between May and August 2014. The customized survey yielded a robust dataset of community preferences opinions and issues that ultimately contributed to the development of alternative growth strategies. Live 36 Work 26 Live Work 29 Neither 9 486 responses 319 written comments 1951 locations noted for households job 13579 individual data points Do they live or work in Greer The Partnership for Tomorrow Kimley-Horn 14 Greer Community Master Plan Community Assessment WHAT WE HEARDSeptember 2014 MetroQuest Online Interactive Survey May 2014 to August 2014 To broaden the range of perspectives an interactive web-based questionnaire was launched and nearly 500 individuals participated between May and August 2014. The customized survey yielded a robust dataset of community preferences opinions and issues that ultimately contributed to the development of alternative growth strategies. Live 36 Work 26 Live Work 29 Neither 9 18 to 24 5 25 to 44 49 45 to 64 43 65 or older 8 486 responses 319 written comments 1951 locations noted for households jobs or parks 13579 individual data points Do they live or work in Greer What was their age group Do they live or work in Greer What is their age group Note 2000 - 2014 ESRI Trend May 2015 What is most important to you Participants were given a list of ten topics and brief descriptions about how each could be applied to the planning process and measured. Participants were asked to rank the three topics most important to them. CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 20 The Partnership for Tomorrow Kimley-Horn 15 Greer Community Master Plan Community Assessment WHAT WE HEARDSeptember 2014 What is most important to you Participants were given a list of ten topics and brief descriptions about how each could be applied to the planning process and measured. Participants were asked to rank the three topics most important to them. Downtown Development Encourage growth commercial and residential in the central business district. Protecting Existing Neighborhoods Maintain the integrity of existing neighborhoods. Transportation Choice Make it easier to bike and walk and improve access to transit. Parks and Open Space Add new parks expand existing parks and protect open space. Infrastructure Keep utility operating and maintenance costs low. Development Pattern Promote a sustainable growth pattern. Transportation Connectivity Add small streets and trails to make it easier to get around. Walkable Neighborhoods Provide a mixture of uses and appealing facilities to encourage people to live work and play without needing a car Housing ChoiceAffordability Offer homes of varying shapes sizes and prices. Less Congestion on Roads Take vehicles off the road or build more lanes. 59 30 15 43 24 27 16 29 15 18 Percent Ranked in the Top 3 Considered together nearly half of the participants ranked transportation in the top 3. y-Horn 14 18 to 24 5 25 to 44 49 45 to 64 43 65 or older 8 bs or parks What was their age group G r e e r Community Master Plan G r e e r Community Master Plan 21 Online Interactive Map Participants were asked to use an interactive web-based map to show specific locations where households jobs and parks should be located in the study area. Nearly 2000 markers were placed on the map by 351 participants. The data was used to create a heat map that shows locations with higher densities for each category. The results from the heat maps were evaluated to inform the creation of the alternative growth strategies for the Greer Community Master Plan. May 2015 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 22 JOBS The number of jobs icons placed on the map 649 was very similar to the number of household icons. The map shows most employment occurring south of Wade Hampton Boulevard with the most robust clusters near downtown and BMW. Comments provided by users suggested an understanding that the type of job will have a big impact on where it should be located in the community. PARKS AND OPEN SPACE Created using 636 icons the parks map shows the communitys desire to live near a park. The density of parks shown on the map reveals concentrations of parks near the core of the community south of Lake Cunningham and the river near Riverside High School and in the Golden Box. HOUSEHOLDS When asked to place households on the map participants created six centers . These centers are distributed throughout the study area with a focus on the central business district. G r e e r Community Master Plan S.W.O.T Participants used dots to select important or high priority strengths weaknesses opportunities and threats developed in earlier outreach efforts. Successes Downtown Greer Easy access to I-85 and US 29 Two major medical centers Weaknesses Lack of downtown rooftops and shopping Lack of downtown hotels Perception branding and name recognition Opportunities Availability of developable land in key locations throughout Greer Threats Potential loss of community identity Coordination efforts between two counties Attracting Generation Y and keeping Baby Boomers 23 The first community workshop at the Cannon Centre allowed citizen planners to weigh in on the plans vision and identify where and how growth should occur through 2030. Approximately 70 residents business owners and stakeholders participated in a variety of activities during the interactive workshop. Community Workshop June 12 2014 May 2015 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 24 One Word The One Word activity asked participants to describe Greer today and their vision for Greer in the future. The following word clouds highlight words and themes that were repeated. Greer Today Vision for the Future G r e e r Community Master Plan EconomicVitality Other themes that are related include... This is a priority because... Downtown Other themes that are related include... This is a priority because... EducationWorkforce Other themes that are related include... This is a priority because... Housing Other themes that are related include... This is a priority because... 25 Out of the top four Economic Vitality was the highest priority for seven out of ten groups and appeared on 10 trees. When asked why Economic Vitality was their top priority these groups noted that growth and a sustainable economy drives most of the other themes. Downtown was the top priority for two groups and appeared on 8 out of 10 trees. Priority Decision Tree This exercise asked community members to rank their top five community themes out of a library of 12. The Priority Decision Tree results showed four themes were consistently ranked highest Economic Vitality Downtown Education Workforce and Housing. May 2015 WEST WADE HAMPTON RIVERSIDE 1-85 EXPANSION N I-85 EAST WADE HAMPTON DOWNTOWN GREER Attendees focused their attention on the following areas Downtown Greer West Wade Hampton East Wade Hampton Area around Riverside High School and GSP Airport SC 14 at I-85 SC 101 at I-85 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 26 Where do we grow The final activity was a mapping exercise designed to determine where new residential commercial mixed-use employment and industry growth should be located over the next 15 years. A composite of all the maps shows the communitys vision is consistent with the Citys Future Land Use Map. G r e e r Community Master Plan 27 The understanding of community dynamics and the outcomes of the initial engagement activities were critical pieces in the creation of the Greer Community Master Plan. The 2013 Greer Strategic Plan broadcasted a mission statement that aligned with information gathered as part of the Greer Community Master Plan Exercise environmentally sound and prudent management of growth and development to increase employment opportunity provide available housing offer abundant recreation and preserve the historic charm of the city. Our Initiatives The Greer Community Master Plan was built on a set of guiding statements centered on the three tenets of the communityPhysical Economic and Cultural. Termed Community Initiatives. These statements shaped the planning process beginning with the evaluation of growth alternatives and selection of the preferred growth strategy Chapter 2 and continuing with the development of the focus areas Chapter 3 and the creation of the framework plans Chapter 4. The Action Plan Chapter 5 refers back to these initiatives to ensure the master plan is aspirational actionable and accountable. perspectives. The oices to be heard llecting opinions t helped guide the ions workshops d ensuring that our Several initiatives emerged during the process centered on three main themes. Looking to the future these tenets guide usour PHYSICAL space our ECONOMIC opportunity and our CULTURAL heritage. Promote downtown and healthy neighborhoods Enhance transportation choice Protect and promote the environment Grow the local economy Emphasize local entrepreneurship Leverage our regional assets Enhance things uniquely Greer Immerse the community in the arts Use our history to shape our future OUR INITIATIVES PHYSICAL ECONOMIC CULTURAL May 2015 CHAPTER1-CommunityInitiatives 28 A common theme that emerged from the planning process is the communitys understanding that the physical environment of the cityits neighborhoods buildings streets utilities and natural resourceshave a far reaching impact on economic vitality and cultural legacy. Each of the four initiatives under the Physical category will have a profound impact on the communitys ability to expand the local economy and leverage the unique heritage of the growing and diversifying community. Introduction Community Types Growth Alternatives Preferred Growth Strategy Preferred Growth Strategy 2 G r e e r Community Master Plan 31 Communities often differentiate themselves based on their willingness to deal with competing interests and to make informed strategic choices. These choices should occur in a process rooted in analysis but balanced with vision and creativity. The master plan allowed the community to identify what they value create a set of alternative approaches to accommodating new growth and selectand modifythe alternative that best aligned the things they value. The preferred growth strategy is a visual representation of how Greer should grow. It expresses in general terms where different types of development should be located. The citys comprehensive plan its policies and code and the direction offered by its elected leaders ultimately will inform the location intensity and design of new developments. In essence the preferred growth strategy expressed in the pages that follow offers context but with the necessary flexibility to respond to shifting trends inherent in a maturing city. In the end the selection of a preferred growth strategy the detail provided in focus studies for critical areas in Greer the development of framework plans and the prioritization of action items aligns with the community initiatives. Introduction The planning process for the Greer Community Master Plan was aspirational... What does Greer want to be without losing sight of the necessary actions that accompany decisions... What steps will be required for Greer to be successful or the need for accountability. How will we measure and what should we anticipate as a result of Greers success Visioning Growth Strategy Focus Areas Framework Plans Action Plan Roll Out Data Analysis Preferred Growth Strategy Report Card Scenarios A B C D Data Collection Explore opportunities and constraints Evaluate alternatives Review results Plan May 2015 CHAPTER2-PreferredGrowthStrategy 32 The growth strategy resulted from a process that identified tested and refined alternative approaches to how Greer could accomodate future growth. G r e e r Community Master Plan 33 Four growth strategy alternatives were created. One alternative tested current plans while the other three offered different ways to accommodate future growth. Concepts for three alternative scenarios were presented to the Partnership for Tomorrow Board of Trustees at its meeting on July 15 2014. The alternatives responded to information gathered throughout the planning process. The Board selected the three alternatives focus on the core outward growth and multiple centersshown diagrammatically here and presented in detail on the pages that follow. The digital growth model allocated growth based on the placement of community- types throughout the study area. When the allocation process was complete the characteristics of the scenario were summarized qualitatively and quantitatively. The intent was to create a flexible approach to growth that meets established performance goals and to identify strategies that meet local visions and regional expectations. FOCUS ON THE CORE Limits outward expansion by focusing on downtown and first teir neighborhoods. OUTWARD GROWTH Accommodates growth in new locations throughout the study area with a decentralized emphasis. MULTIPLE CENTERS Limits outward expansion by creating clusters of residential employment and mixed-use growth. Growth Concpets May 2015 CHAPTER2-PreferredGrowthStrategy 34 Three questions must be asked when creating a plan for future growth A single tool cannot provide comprehensive and coordinated answers to these questions. The Greer Community Master Plan process includes a digital growth model to answer Where an embedded market assessment to answer What and a multi-faceted outreach campaign to answer How. The coordinated process guided by a technical committee of local staff and an oversight committee of community stakeholders ensures the analysis and answers are considered in tandem. Where do we grow What do we grow How do we grow Where What How G r e e r Community Master Plan 35 Community types represent the different land use types and development patterns existing in or envisioned for Greer. They represent the look or feel of a place that sets it apart from other areas. Community types have their own unique setting devel- opment pattern and visual qualities. Rather than focusing exclusively on land use categories the community-types provide a more descriptive way to convey the techni- cal e.g. density floor area ratios land use mixtures parking and block structure and visual e.g. appearance mixture of uses design and structure characteristics. The community types are the unit of analysis for the growth scenarios. They are not intend- ed to be completely synonymous with the countys zoning ordinance. They also are not intended to replace language in the locally-adopted land use plans. How We Use Them Greer Community Master Plan Future Initiatives Preferred Growth Strategy Street Typology Street Design Priority Matrix Framework Plans Comprehensive Plan Multimodal Transportation Plans Corridor Studies Small Area Plans Community Types Rural Living Waterfront Living Suburban Living Traditional Neighborhood Downtown Neighborhood Center Suburban Center Regional Center Employment Center Manufacturing Logistics Center Community Types May 2015 CHAPTER2-PreferredGrowthStrategy 36 Rural Living These areas have abundant open space and scenic countryside with widely separated large- lot home sites. Some cluster developments or conservation-based subdivisions set aside areas for open space. Primary Single-Family Detached Working Farm Secondary Single-Family Attached Cluster Civic and Institutional Parks Open Space and Trails L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Separate Uses Typical Lot Coverage 5 to 10 Typical Use Coverage 95 Residential5 Non-Residential Residential Density 1 to 2.5 Density UnitsAcre Non-Residential Intensity NA Prevailing Building Height 1 to 2 Stories Typical Block Length 2500 to 5000 Feet Street Pattern Curvilinear Street Connectivity Low Transportation Options Auto Open Space Elements Farmland Forest and Natural Areas Parking Provision Private Driveways Design Guidance Waterfront Living These areas activate appropriate locations along the waters edge with residential and non- residential water-focused uses with consideration for environmental and water supply impacts. Development should leverage being near seeing and interacting with Lake Robinson and Lake Cunningham. Primary Single-Family Detached Townhome Multifamily Cultural Secondary Commercial Neighborhood-scale Civic and Institutional Parks Open Space and Trails L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Separate Uses Typical Lot Coverage 5 to 10 Typical Use Coverage 95 Residential5 Non-Residential Residential Density 1 to 2.5 Density UnitsAcre Non-Residential Intensity 0.50 to 1.00 FAR Prevailing Building Height 1 to 2 Stories Typical Block Length 2500 to 5000 Feet Street Pattern Curvilinear Street Connectivity Low Transportation Options Auto Water Open Space Elements Greenways Blueways Natural Areas Parking Provision Private Driveways Design Guidance G r e e r Community Master Plan 37 Suburban Living These areas typically represent relatively uniform housing types and density in neighborhoods of mainly single-family detached homes. The transportation network typically includes larger blocks and curvilinear streets. Strategic connections to the off- street multi-use trail network are preferred. Primary Single-Family Detached Townhome Senior Housing Secondary Multi-Family Civic and Institutional Parks Open Space and Trails L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Separate Uses Typical Lot Coverage 25 to 65 Typical Use Coverage 80 Residential20 Non-Residential Residential Density 1 to 5 Density UnitsAcre Non-Residential Intensity NA Prevailing Building Height 1 to 2 Stories Typical Block Length 600 to 1200 Feet Street Pattern Curvilinear Street Connectivity Low Transportation Options Auto Bicycle Open Space Elements Parks Greenways and Natural Areas Parking Provision Private Driveways Design Guidance Traditional Neighborhood These areas include a variety of housing types residential densities goods and services supported by a multi-modal transportation network. The design and scale encourage active living and afford the ability for residents to live work shop and play within a walkable community. Primary Single-Family Detached Townhome Multi-family Senior Housing Restaurant Commercial Neighborhood-scale Professional Office Secondary Civic and Institutional Parks Open Space and Trails L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Mixed Uses Typical Lot Coverage 35 to 60 Typical Use Coverage 75 Residential25 Non-Residential Residential Density 4 to 12 Density UnitsAcre Non-Residential Intensity 0.35 to 1.00 FAR Prevailing Building Height 1 to 3 Stories Typical Block Length 300 to 1200 Feet Street Pattern Grid Street Connectivity High Transportation Options Auto Bicycle Pedestrian Transit Open Space Elements Parks Plazas Parking Provision Surface lot On-street and Private Driveways Design Guidance May 2015 CHAPTER2-PreferredGrowthStrategy 38 Downtown This area represents the civic entertainment and cultural heart of the community. Small blocks with streets designed to encourage pedestrian activity are fronted by two or more story buildings. Residential units above storefronts are prevalent. The compact walkable environment and mix of uses support multiple modes of transportation. Primary Townhome Multi-family Restaurant sit-down Commercial Neighborhood-scale Professional Office Community Facilities Secondary Farmers Market Pocket Park Day Care L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Mixed Uses Typical Lot Coverage 75 to 95 Typical Use Coverage 45 Residential55 Non-Residential Residential Density 6 to 10 Density UnitsAcre Non-Residential Intensity 0.35 to 1.00 FAR Prevailing Building Height 1 to 4 Stories 60 ft max Typical Block Length 300 to 600 Feet Street Pattern Grid Street Connectivity High Transportation Options Auto Bicycle Pedestrian and Transit Open Space Elements Pocket Parks Plazas Parking Provision Surface lot On-street and Structured Design Guidance Neighborhood Center These small-scale areas provide goods and services to immediate neighborhoods. The proximity to residential areas requires thoughtful design and scale that transitions effectively between uses. The transportation network limits cut-through traffic on nearby residential streets and provides safe bicycle and pedestrian connections. Primary Restaurant sit down Retail community-serving Convenience Store Dry Cleaner Bank Personal Care Secondary Farmers Market Pocket Park L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Separate or Mixed Uses Typical Lot Coverage 35 to 50 Typical Use Coverage 60 Residential40 Non-Residential Residential Density 1 Density UnitsAcre Non-Residential Intensity 0.35 to 0.85 FAR Prevailing Building Height 1 to 2 Stories Typical Block Length 400 to 1000 Feet Street Pattern Grid Street Connectivity Low Transportation Options Auto Bicycle and Pedestrian Open Space Elements Parks Plazas and Ponds Parking Provision Surface lot On-street Design Guidance G r e e r Community Master Plan 39 Suburban Center These areas tend to locate along roads with higher traffic volumes and near prominent intersections. They typically include multi-tenant strip centers big box stores and large shopping malls. Buildings are set back from the road behind large surface parking lots with limited connectivity. Primary Restaurant General Commercial Multi-Tenant Commercial Hotel Professional Office Secondary Civic and Institutional Parks Open Space and Trails Trail L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Separate Uses Typical Lot Coverage 20 to 40 Typical Use Coverage 40 Residential60 Non-Residential Residential Density NA Non-Residential Intensity 0.20 to 0.50 FAR Prevailing Building Height 1 to 2 Stories Typical Block Length 800 to 1200 Feet Street Pattern Curvilinear Street Connectivity Low Transportation Options Auto Bicycle Open Space Elements Natural Areas Parking Provision Surface Lot Design Guidance Regional Center These areas attract people beyond Greer for shopping employment recreation or housing. They typically are large-scale master-planned communities built in phases with a mix of residential nonresidential and civic uses. They typically locate near major highways and often at interstate exits. Primary Multi-Tenant Commercial Big Box Commercial Hotel Professional Office Multi-Family Single-Family Detached Secondary Civic and Institutional Parks Open Space and Trails L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Separate or Mixed Uses Typical Lot Coverage 25 to 65 Typical Use Coverage 20 Residential80 Non-Residential Residential Density NA Non-Residential Intensity 0.35 to 1.50 FAR Prevailing Building Height 1 to 3 Stories Typical Block Length 600 to 3000 Feet Street Pattern Grid or Curvilinear Street Connectivity Varies Transportation Options Auto Open Space Elements Parks Natural Areas Parking Provision Surface lot On-street and Structured Design Guidance May 2015 CHAPTER2-PreferredGrowthStrategy 40 Employment Center These areas offer a variety of ways to accommodate jobs including stand-alone businesses corporate campuses office parks medical campuses or higher education facilities. These areas typically are located near major transportation corridors. Primary Professional Office Medical Research and Development Light Industrial Flex Space Secondary Commercial Serving center Civic and Institutional Parks Open Space and Trails L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Separate Uses Typical Lot Coverage 25 to 65 Typical Use Coverage 10 Residential90 Non-Residential Residential Density NA Non-Residential Intensity 0.20 to 0.50 FAR Prevailing Building Height 1 to 3 Stories Typical Block Length 800 to 3000 Feet Street Pattern Grid or Curvilinear Street Connectivity Varies Transportation Options Auto Open Space Elements Natural Areas Parking Provision Surface lot Design Guidance Manufacturing Logistics Center These areas support large-scale manufacturing and production including assembly and processing regional warehousing and distribution bulk storage and utilities. These areas are found near major transportation corridors highway or rail. Primary Factory Heavy Assembly Warehouse Distribution and Trucking Secondary Commercial small-scale Open Space L a n d U s e C o n s i d e r a t i o n s Land Use Mix Separate or Mixed Uses Typical Lot Coverage 35 to 50 Typical Use Coverage 60 Residential40 Non-Residential Residential Density 1 Density UnitsAcre Non-Residential Intensity 0.35 to 0.85 FAR Prevailing Building Height 1 to 2 Stories Typical Block Length 400 to 1000 Feet Street Pattern Grid Street Connectivity Low Transportation Options Auto Bicycle and Pedestrian Open Space Elements Parks Plazas and Ponds Parking Provision Surface lot On-street Design Guidance G r e e r Community Master Plan 41 This growth alternative is based on the comprehensive plans for Greer Greenville County and Spartanburg County. The scenario includes the concepts of multiple suburban centers and regional centers and expanded residential growth with clusters of employment in existing locations. Current Plans May 2015 CHAPTER2-PreferredGrowthStrategy 42 This growth alternative limits the outward expansion of the community and emphasizes traditional town planning for the core. The scenario includes two regional centers at I-85. And Downtown Greer more than doubles in size. Focus on the Core G r e e r Community Master Plan 43 The growth alternative offers traditional suburban development at the edges of the planning boundary. New growth is serviced by a few suburban centers. Employment occurs in current manufacturing and logistics locations as well as along US 29. The core remains essentially unchanged and large regional centers are located at I-85. Outward Growth May 2015 CHAPTER2-PreferredGrowthStrategy 44 This growth alternative concentrates growth in walkable centers. Less outward expansion occurs and US 29 has distinct centers that develop along the corridor. Downtown becomes the largest center with some regional opportunities at I-85 providing employment opportunities near the interstate. Multiple Centers G r e e r Community Master Plan 45 The Community Initiatives were developed in response to public input and refined by the Oversight Committee. These guiding statements were used in the scenario planning process to develop performance measures that allowed a standardized way to evaluate the relative performance of the four scenarios. In effect the performance of the scenarios was judged against the plans Community Initiatives Create healthy neighborhoods Multiple Centers best addressed this initiative by offering a diversity of housing choices most of which would occur in walkable neighborhoods. While Outward Growth limits the amount of walkable neighborhoods it still provides housing choices. Current Plans also performed well in offering appropriate housing choices. Promote downtownAs expected the Focus on the Core scenario promoted downtown by injecting most growth into an expanding downtown. The Oversight Committee expressed concern that the expanded downtown could come at the expense of first tier neighborhoods and likely does not reflect economic realities in the near term. Report Card Enhance transportation choice Both Focus on the Core and Multiple Centers performed well in promoting accessibility and mobility throughout the study area. Protect and promoting the environmentFocus on the Core again performs well against this initiative though Multiple Centers provided consistency across all metrics. Outwork Growth and Current Plans performed poorer than the other alternatives. Grow the local economy Each alternative showed positive performance against the backdrop of growing the local economy. Earning potential and job diversity showed net gain across the board. It should be noted that the sixth initiative Enhance things uniquely Greer was determined to be best reflected as a blend of the other initiatives and therefore is not included in the report card to the right. May 2015 CHAPTER2-PreferredGrowthStrategy 46 Create Healthy Neighborhoods Housing for the Future New housing is built to meet the lifestyle of future residents. Walkable Neighborhoods New housing is built in walkable communities Housing Diversity New housing is balanced between single-family and multifamily. Promote Downtown Working Downtown Ratio of new jobs downtown. Living Downtown Ratio of new residences downtown. Prospering Downtown Footprint of downtown. Enhance Transportation Choices Accessibility Access to housing jobs services and amenities. Walkability New growth promotes trips by foot. Bikability New growth promotes trips by bike. Protect and Promote Environment Job Proximity New jobs are located where residents live. Development Footprint Amount of land consumed due to new growth. Natural Resources Wise stewardship of scenic vistas and open space. Grow the Local Economy Earning Potential New job growth supports more high-paying jobs. Job Diversity New job growth is balanced across sectors. Current Plans Focus on the Core Outward Growth Multiple Centers G r e e r Community Master Plan 47 Preferred Growth Strategy The Oversight Committee requested the Multiple Centers concept be refined into the preferred growth strategy at its meeting on September 23 2014. After careful consideration of scenario feedback the Multiple Centers scenario exhibited qualities that were the most consistent with the Community Initiatives. The preferred growth strategy was adapted from the Multiple Centers concept and finalized based on a review by city staff and local stakeholders. While the strategy closely resembles the Multiple Centers alternative it includes features from each of the four scenarios. The scenario evaluation represented one of several ways the planning process yielded a strategy for balancing competing interests in Greer. The preferred growth strategy serves as the foundation for the development of framework plans directly related to land use multimodal transportation parks and open space and arts and culture. The strategy also offered input into other plan elements that provide additional detail on land development physical character and policy initiatives. The preferred growth strategy as a blend of all the scenarios reinforces the concept that a one size fits all strategy for community development does not exist. The preferred growth strategy offers a diversity of housing choice enhanced connectivity and a thriving downtown. May 2015 CHAPTER2-PreferredGrowthStrategy 48 Focus Areas 3 Introduction Downtown Wade Hampton South 14 Corridor South 101 Corridor 51 G r e e r Community Master Plan The preferred growth strategy identifies areas most suitable for accommodating future growth and development over the next 10 to 20 years. The planning process also included engagement activities designed to determine the communitys vision and preferences for future growth areas. Planning workshops held with the general public and the Greater Greer Chamber of Commerce in June 2014 included a brief presentation followed by several activities that enabled participants to identify future areas for addition residential commercial mixed-use employment and industrial development. In July 2014 the planning team and a technical team of community leaders identified four areas for more detailed study based on the preferred growth strategy and public input. Each focus area was chosen based on its current character high susceptibility to change and ability to accommodate future growth The focus areas are a critical component of the Greer Community Master Plan because they Identify key sites and strategies critical to Greers continued growth and enhancement. Illustrate how design principles can guide future land use and development decisions. Define key public improvements and initiatives to catalyze appropriate growth and enhancement. Downtown Greer including Greer Station Wade Hampton near Buncombe Road SC 14 interchange of SC 14 at I-85 SC 101 interchange of SC 101 at I-85 Introduction CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 52 May 2015 Low Medium High recently developed active residential properties environmentally delicate sites or disputable development areas older retail structures that will reach the end of their typical life cycle within the next few years or environmentally hazardous sites undeveloped properties properties exhibiting vacancy or significant underutilization 53 G r e e r Community Master Plan The first step in developing each focus area involved a review of existing conditions GIS data and public input to determine which parcels were most likely to change over the next 10 to 20 years. Parcels were assigned to one of three categoriesLow Medium or Highbased on their susceptibility to change. Parcels that were vacant or for sale typically were identified as highly susceptible. Medium and low susceptibility was based on the current use condition size and marketability. The graphic at right shows the susceptibility to change for the Downtown focus area. Areas in need of attention or most likely able to accommodate future growth include Greer Station particularly areas on the south end of Trade Street Between Trade Street and City Park The Victor Mill area The North Main Street Corridor Downtown CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 54 May 2015 Susceptibility to Change Low Medium High Low Medium High The North Main Corridor subarea begins at Wade Hampton Boulevard and stretches south to West Church and Jason Street. This subarea includes retail and residential parcels along North Main Street and the J. Harley Bonds Career and Educational Resource Center former Greer High School. The downtown core area is divided into two sections Greer Station and a proposed Arts District. The Greer Station subarea includes development north of the railroad between Miller Street to the west Church Street and Jason Street to the north and SC 101 North Line Street to the east. The second piece of the downtown core the proposed Arts District subarea includes the area south of the railroad tracks to Moore Street Mayfield Street and Daniel Avenue. The Victor Mill subarea encompasses land from Daniel Avenue and Snow Street between SC 101South Line Street and Victor Avenue. North Main Corridor Greer Station Arts District Victor Mill 55 G r e e r Community Master Plan This susceptibility to change assessment and input from the community informed the creation of four subareas within the downtown study area. Subareas CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 56 May 2015 57 G r e e r Community Master Plan In addition to the land use and development recommendations outlined on the following pages a series of connectivity and mobility improvements is recommended for the greater Downtown area. This combination of roadway pedestrian bicycle and urban design improvements seek to enhance access to and walkability within the area and between downtown and adjacent neighborhoods. Details concerning each improvement are contained with the following sections as well as the Action Plan in Chapter 5. Transportation CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 58 May 2015 Greer Station and Arts District 1. N. Main Street Wade Hampton Boulevard Intersection Improvement 2. N. Main Street Improvements 3. Poinsett Street Improvements 4. Trade Street Enhancements 5. DowntownVictor Mill Loop Trail 6. South Line Street Improvements Victoria and Randall Street Improvements PointsettCannonDepot Street Intersection Improvements Cannon Street Improvements Pelham Street Enhancements New Roadway Connection through Greer Arts District 1 2 4 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 59 G r e e r Community Master Plan The North Main Street Corridor serves as a vital link between Wade Hampton Boulevard and Greer Station. Although several corridors provide access to downtown from Wade Hampton Boulevard North Main Street serves as the most direct route. Greer Station sits less than four blocks from the intersection of Wade Hampton Boulevard and North Main Street but due to poor wayfinding most motorists traveling along Wade Hampton Boulevard do not realize how close they are to downtown. Recommendations Wade Hampton Boulevard at North Main Street Improvements A visual gateway at the intersection of Wade Hampton Boulevard and North Main Street would be a beneficial and cost-effective short-term investment. This improvement would provide wayfinding to Greer Station. With innovative urban design and landscaping features this intersection also would serve as a landmark and gateway to downtown. Improvements could include Enhanced landscaping andor public art in green space on the corners of the intersection Distinctive crosswalks or intersection paving throughout the intersection. While three of the four corners of the intersection have significant setbacks the Spinx gas station in the northwest quadrant is more challenging. WADE HAMPTON BOULEVARD VANDIVENTER DRIVE W. BEARDEN STREET WEST FAIRVIEW AVENUE HILTONSTREET W. ARLINGTON AVENUE W. CHURCH STREET JASON STREET CANNONSTREET FAIRVIEW AVENUE E. BEARDEN STREET BERRY AVENUE E. ARLINGTON AVENUE WADE HAMPTON BOULEVARD N.MILLERSTREET FEW STREET MILLERSTREET ARLINGTON ROAD N.LINESTREET 1 A 2 CCCAAANNNNNNOOONNNSSSTTTRRREEEEEETTT North Main Corridor CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 60 May 2015 Design Standards The city should consider site design standards along North Main Street to maintain and reinforce the historic character of the street. The standards should Ensure buildings front the street. Limit driveways to one side of the building or limit access to side streets. Place parking behind buildings rather than in front of building along Main Street. While much of the street still retains a historic walkable character gaps created by recent redevelopment identified in orange on the North Main Street plan undermine the link between Wade Hampton Boulevard Greer Station and the communitys character. Where parking lots remain adjacent to North Main Street 6 to 12 foot landscape buffers with upright trees and shrubs should be required between sidewalks and private surface parking lots e.g. Memorial United Methodist Church. Street Enhancements The city also should consider a corridor enhancement project for North Main Street. Currently North Main Street is a four-lane arterial between West Church Street and Wade Hampton Boulevard. However low traffic volumes do not justify the four travel lanes. To improve the character and walkability of North Main Street consideration should be given to narrowing the roadway to three lanes one in each direction with a center turn lane. The extra space should be used to add bicycle lanes without moving the curb and gutter or reconstructing the curb and gutter to provide wide landscape buffers and sidewalks on both sides of the street. Potential North Main Street Section 61 G r e e r Community Master Plan Downtown Greer otherwise known as Greer Station is the heart of the City. The area includes community anchors such as City Hall the Cannon Centre and City Park historic buildings along Trade Street between Poinsett and Randall Streets and historic buildings along Poinsett Street between Main Street and Cannon Street. Businesses bounded by North Main Street Poinsett Street and the railroad account for less than 25 acres of land yet Greer Station represents the most cherished walkable area in the city. Great strides have been made over the last 15 years to maintain and enhance Trade Street strengthen the Greer Station brand and add a cluster of restaurants to the area. This success has led the community to envision the next step for Greer Station. To continue to increase the vitality of Greer Station stronger connections and additional building fabric are needed connect Trade Street to City Park and surrounding neighborhoods. Greer Station Cannon Street at Poinsett Street Improvements Intersection and urban design improvements are recommended for the intersection of East Poinsett Cannon Victoria and Depot Streets. Improvements should include high visibility or specialty paving crosswalks andor specialty paving within the intersection itself. Ideally a future retailrestaurant or office building would be constructed on the southwest corner of the intersection fronting Victoria Street. In the short-term public parking is at a premium. However the north end of the parking lot accommodates few parking spaces due to the awkward geometry of the site. Victoria Street and Randall Street Improvements Roadway and streetscape improvements along Victoria Street and Randall Street would further enhance the connection between Trade Street and the City Hall complex. Narrow right-of-way on Victoria Street may limit improvements to pedestrian enhancements such as sidewalks lighting and landscaping. However Randall Street is wider and offers more opportunity to enhance pedestrian amenities and provide bicycle facilities and or on-street parking. MOORE ST. MOORE ST. RANDALL ST. SCHOOLST. VICTORIA ST. SMAIN ST. S-101 S-101 DEPOTST. TRADEST. FEW ST. JASON ST. CANNONST. NMAINST. MAYFIELD M ST. TRADEST. DANIEL AVE. PARKAVE. MARCHANT ST. ALBERTST CHAPTER3-FocusAreas A 62 May 2015 63 G r e e r Community Master Plan Greer Station Increasing Retailers and Restaurants In addition to physical connections to community anchors more employees and residents are needed within walking distance of the urban core. Adding these people to the population near downtown will further enhance the viability and sustainability of retail and restaurants in the area. Fortunately ample land on the east west and south ends of Greer Station can support these uses as standalone buildings or above ground floor retailrestaurants. Cannon Street Improvements As Greer Stations growth continues Cannon Street between Poinsett Street and the Cannon Centre may become more viable for complementary development. Roadway and sidewalk improvements should be considered to connect the Cannon Centre to Greer Station retailers restaurants residences and businesses. If private development occurs or a community facility is constructed on the west side of Cannon Street facing City Park commensurate roadway and pedestrian ammentities should also improve. Connections to Adjacent Neighborhoods Sidewalk lighting and crossing improvements would improve the connection between Greer Station and nearby residential neighborhoods. Primary connections should be considered along North Main Street to the north Poinsett Street to the west and Trade Street and Pelham Street to the south. Sidewalk connections should also be improved to the Sunnyside neighborhood. All homes within a quarter mile a 5-to-10 minute walk of Trade Street should be able to enjoy a safe walk to Greer Station. This connectivity is vital to the long-term success of the Greer Station business environment. CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 64 May 2015 65 G r e e r Community Master Plan Goals Connect Trade Street to City Park Enhance the critical mass of downtown retailers and restaurants Add downtown employers and residences to support downtown retail and restaurants Connect N. Main Poinsett and TradePelham to adjacent neighborhoods to promote walkability and the frequency of trips from the neighborhoods to the central business district Greer Station Strategies Improve and join the intersection of Poinsett Cannon and Depot Streets Improve and connect Victoria and Randall Streets to City Park Improve North Main Street Poinsett Street pedestrian improvements Improvements to Cannon Street with future development. CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 66 May 2015 Greer Station and Arts District 1. N. Main Street Wade Hampton Boulevard Intersection Improvement 2. N. Main Street Improvements 3. Poinsett Street Improvements 4. Trade Street Enhancements 5. DowntownVictor Mill Loop Trail 6. South Line Street Improvements Victoria and Randall Street Improvements PointsettCannonDepot Street Intersection Improvements Cannon Street Improvements Pelham Street Enhancements New Roadway Connection through Greer Arts District 1 2 4 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 67 G r e e r Community Master Plan With the proximity to the working railroads the area south of Greer Station tends to support lower rents and to be less desirable for investment and development despite being close to Greer Stations retailrestaurant core. Much of the area has remained industrial and over the years several buildings have been torn down and others left vacant. The area is an important catalyst to the areas growth and many of the older industrial buildings have potential to be rehabilitated into unique interesting spaces. A frequent talking point among residents and community leaders was the need to leverage the citys history and growing interest in the arts by creating a cluster of activity near downtown. The Greer Civic Master Plan recommends that the area between the rail lines become the focal point of a new Greer Arts District. The Arts District could reinvigorate the area south of Greer Station and contribute to the critical mass of businesses employees and residents in and around downtown. While safety codes cannot be relaxed the city should be open to a greater variety of structures and flexibility of uses within the Arts District. Redevelopment Development of the Arts District could occur by renovating warehouses and industrial buildings or creating open flexible structures that lend themselves to artisan studios workspaces and loft housing. Proximity to the rail lines would likely would keep lease rates low which should allow the district to remain viable and less susceptible to gentrification as it becomes trendy. The separation from Greer Station by the rail lines also provides a natural transition line between the more contemporary building materials and forms of the Arts District and the more traditional historic form of Greer Station. As the district takes shape additional roadway connections such as a connection between the rail lines from South Main Street to Trade Street may be desired. Sidewalk Improvements Recent sidewalk improvements along Trade Street should be extended across the rail lines to the Arts District. While the citys standard sidewalk treatment should be extended other urban design features such as benches and lighting could take on a different character in the Arts District. The railroad crossing provides an opportunity for more artistic warning devices and urban design amenities. Arts District CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 68 May 2015 69 G r e e r Community Master Plan Building Enhancement or Partnership Fund The city or PFT should consider establishing a building enhancement or partnership fund for the Arts District. Similar to a more traditional faade grant program matching grants could be offered to improve or construct structures within the Arts District. Generally these funds would provide seed money and reimbursements for a percentage of costs for construction activity that fosters arts cultural or loft housing. For example the fund may provide reimbursement for 25 of renovation cost to existing buildings or 10 of new construction cost up to an established cap e.g. 10000 to 20000. This type of investment fund provides incentives to private landowners and leaves control of property and construction in the hands of the private sector. Strategies Extend Trade Street sidewalk and landscape treatments south of the railroad tracks add artistic elements to railroad crossings signage building facades etc. Foster rehab of existing building fabric while allowing flexibility for renovations and infill Provide funding or incentives for arts cultural and loft housing uses in the Arts District Provide new roadway connections between the railroad tracks to Main Street and Poinsett Arts District CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 70 May 2015 Greer Station Arts District MOORE ST. MOORE ST. WESTFIELD AVE. LINDALLST. RANDALL ST. SCHOOLST. VICTORIA ST. SMAIN ST. S-101 S-101 DEPOTST. TRADEST. FEW ST. JASON ST. CANNONST. W CHURCH ST. BALLENGER W ARLINGTON AVE NMAINST. NMAINST. MAYFIELD PELLHAM ST. TRADEST. DANIEL AVE. PARKAVE. MARCHANT ST. ALBERTST. Page 1 of 1 G r e e r Community Master Plan 71 Image Spartanburg Public Library Historical Digital Collections William Lynch Postcard Collection 1910-1919 Victor Mill built in the 1890s was one of four major textile plants in the greater GreenvilleSpartanburg area. In the 1920s Victor Mill served as a model for successful mill communities. Small villages were created as homes churches schools and recreational facilities were built to support plant workers and their families. With more than 200 employees working at the plant Victor Mill shaped much of downtown Greers growth and development. As the 20th century progressed more foreign cloth came into the United States leading to the modernization of textile technology. Victor Mill closed in 2001 and the structure was ravaged by fire in 2004. After sitting partially demolished until 2008 the Environmental Protection Agency conducted a site contamination study. In 2011 Spartanburg County formally took ownership of the site and though the site has been cleaned-up it remains vacant. Today the 20-acre site a half- mile from downtown Greer technically resides in Spartanburg Countyan island within the city limits of Greer. While the community desires to redevelop the Victor Mill site limited potential uses for the large site exist. Due to limited accessibility a major office or commercial retail development on the site is unlikely. Environmental concerns make the site unsuitable for single-family residential development. And while multi-family development is a possibility market demand does not exist and a standalone multi- family development would not be the necessary catalyst for the surrounding neighborhood. Victor Mill Community Center The redevelopment of Victor Mill should enhance surrounding neighborhoods and support the overarching goal of enhancing downtown. As a result the best use of the property would be as a community recreation facility. Access to recreation facilities and fields has been voiced as a community desire throughout the Greer Community Master Plan process. A community recreation facility on the Victor Mill site could consolidate nearby parks Stevens Field Veterans Park and Victor Park into a single more significant recreational anchor for the city. Victor Mill Sources Trevor Anderson GoUpstate.com Victor Mill Its a blight on Spartanburg County published Tuesday October 21 2008. httpwww.goupstate.com article20081021NEWS810210340p2tcpg History 2009-2015 The Greenville Textile Heritage Society. Greenville South Carolina - httpscmillhills.commillsmonaghanhistory CHAPTER3-ConceptPlans May 2015 CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 72 Image Spartanburg Public Library Historical Digital Collections William Lynch Postcard Collection 1910-1919 G r e e r Community Master Plan 73 The diagram and images to the right illustrate the types of facilities that could be accommodated on the 20- acre site. While not a specific proposal the illustration shows a mix of facilities including a daycare center near 14th Street a youth soccer field two full size football fields and a community center. The community center approximately 23 the size of the Greenville County Eastside Family YMCA is large enough to accommodate a gymnasium or natatorium. This type of facility whether owned by the city YMCA Boys and Girls Club or a similar organizationwould likely offer the greatest impact to the surrounding neighborhoods as well as the community as a whole. Trail Loop The illustration also shows a potential multi-use trail loop to link the parks. The trail could border South Line Street Victor Avenue through the park and potentially 23rd or 24th Street. In addition to providing a community amenity it would connect to Trade Street and Greer Station to increase access between the downtown core and neighborhoods to the south and east. Victor Mill Goals Create a community destination and focal point near Greer Station Anchor and stabilize surrounding neighborhoods Link green spaces together into a larger scale community park rather than three having disparate park spaces Strategies Partner with or develop a community center Provide outdoor recreation facilities Link the parks and Greer Station through a multi-use trail May 2015 CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 74 Victor Mill 1. Victor Mill Site Development 2. Multi-use Loop Trail 3. S. Line Street Enhancements B 5 6 75 G r e e r Community Master Plan Wade Hampton Boulevard is a major regional route between Greenville and Spartanburg and land uses along the 30- mile corridor vary. The City of Greer has enhanced Wade Hampton Boulevard within the city limits through new development signage standards improved architecture and landscaping. The focus area extents Brannon Drive to Tryon Street were chosen to address key intersections at Buncombe Road and West Poinsett Street and account for the newer commercial developments just west of the intersection at Buncombe Road. While the master plan outlines strategies for the entire focus area a more immediate emphasis is placed on areas surrounding the intersections at Buncombe Road and West Poinsett Street. Both of these corridors provide access to downtown and show a greater likelihood for improvement over the next 10 to 15 years as illustrated on the susceptibility diagram on the facing page. Building on recent higher quality development in the area along Wade Hampton Boulevard the city should consider establishing andor strengthening the corridors site design architectural and signage standards. Site Design In general building setbacks should be limited based on the size of the structures and parking should be prohibited between outparcel buildings and the public right-of-way. Setbacks for other retail structures should not exceed 80 feet for stand-alone retailrestaurant structures or 250 feet from the public right-of-way. Landscape standards should incorporate tree plantings along the public right of way and within larger surface parking lots. While these applications primarily relate to new development the city could retrofit portions of the corridor by seeking state and federal grants typically transportation alternative grants under the current federal transportation legislation. Architectural Standards and Wayfinding Stronger architectural standards near the intersection of Wade Hampton Boulevard and West Poinsett Street would provide a gateway and wayfinding to downtown. Brick should be a major building material and more traditional architectural forms Wade Hampton CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 76 May 2015 Susceptibility to Change Low Medium High Low Medium High 77 G r e e r Community Master Plan should be a part of major renovations more than 50 of the propertys assessed value or new construction within 400 feet of West Poinsett Street. Additional gateway urban design elements and landscaping also should be considered at the intersection of Wade Hampton and West Poinsett Street to solidify the connection to Greer Station. Mixed-Use Nodes Consistent with the preferred growth strategy growth and investment near the intersection of Wade Hampton Boulevard and Buncombe Road would create a concentrated node with a mix of uses. Greater emphasis should be given to placemaking and creating development centers rather than development corridors. In partnership with the private sector the City of Greer could recognize this potential through future development of this proposed mixed-use node. Likewise the gateway to downtown at West Poinsett Street could likely support multi-story development with a mix of commercial retail office and potentially residential uses in a walkable development. Multi-use Trails As the area continues to evolve West Poinsett Street should become a multimodal corridor that connects these development nodes to Greer Station. Additional trail connections to nearby residential areas should be considered along Chick Springs Road Lancaster Road and Buncombe Road. Wade Hampton Goals Maintain and enhance the Wade Hampton corridor with increased site development and design standards Establish architectural standards to create a gateway to Greer Station at Poinsett encourage the use of traditional building materials including brick traditional architectural forms Foster opportunities to diversify land uses along Wade Hampton including mixed-use buildings and multi-use sites that include office andor residential Strategies Review and enhance site signage and sidewalk standards for Wade Hampton Establish architectural standards for the Greer Station Gateway area Construct intersection improvement potentially a roundabout at Buncombe at Taylor Road Establish sidewalk and urban design standards for Buncombe Road Establish multiuse trails paths along Chick Springs to Greer Station and along South Buncombe to Brushy Creek Trail CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 78 May 2015 Preliminary Project List 1. Wade Hampton Boulevard Enhancements Phase 1 Brannon Road to East of Middleton Way 2. Greer Station GatewayPoinsett Enhancements Wade Hampton Blvd. to Memorial Drive 3. S. Buncombe101 Enhacements Taylor Road to Hood Road 4. Buncombe to Brushy Creek Trail 5. Chick Springs to Greer Station Trail 6. N. Buncombe Taylor Road Intersection Improvement Potential Roundabout 1 2 3 4 5 6 79 G r e e r Community Master Plan The interchange of SC 14 at I-85 is a major southern gateway and access point into the City of Greer. Though sections of the corridor do not fall within Greers city limits Greer wraps along and around SC 14 from Hammett Bridge Road to the Enoree River. The Greenville-Spartanburg Airport along with major industrial development is located north of the interchange. Pelham Medical Center the Pelham-Batesville Fire Department and large areas of vacant land exist to the south. While the SC 14 corridorparticularly south of I-85 West Poinsett Streetis an important growth area for Greer future development is limited by the Greenville- Spartanburg International Airport GSP Environs Area. The GSP Environs Area illustrated with hatching on the Susceptibility to Change diagram to the right caps the heights of structures and limits potential land uses to those that are compatible with airport operations and safety. A major restriction in this area is the limitations to residential development and assembly spaces. Though the Susceptibility to Change diagram provides a good overview of available developable land many of these opportunities are restricted by the GSP Environs Area. Most of the development opportunities lie to the east of this zone and thus on the east side of SC 14. The preferred growth strategy identifies the SC 14 corridor as an employment center that builds off the airport and Pelham Medical Center. The area also is appropriate for supporting local-service commercial retail and residential development particularly along Abner Creek and Brockman- McClimon Roads. Corridor Standards South 14 Corridor As a first step corridor standards should be developed for SC 14. Potential corridor standards would enhance SC 14 as a gateway into and out of Greer and ensure development along the corridor is more compatible with Pelham Medical Center. Corridor standards also should focus on appropriate sidewalktrail widths landscape buffers lighting and site architectural design standards to maintain a focus on more connected higher- quality future development. Additional urban design gateway features may be considered at the interchange. Mixed-Use Development A significant development opportunity along the SC 14 corridor is the large undeveloped area between I-85 and Pelham Medical Center. A mixed-use master-planned development that balances land uses and promotes growth and investment is necessary given the need to cluster commercial retail and restaurant development in this area. The presence of Dillard Creek through the site is a major asset that could be leveraged. The focus area plan limits retail and restaurant development to a walkable village-style area along the east side of SC 14 north of the medical center. All areas east of Dillard Creek should be considered for open space and residential development that could be directly connected to the village retail center via a footbridge and walking trail. The northern end of the site can be CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 80 May 2015 Susceptibility to Change Low Medium High Low Medium High 81 G r e e r Community Master Plan enhanced by extending East Phillips Road from SC 14 along the frontage of I-85 to Brokman-McClimon Road. This roadway would improve connectivity in the area and enhance the northern portion of the site as a future office and employment center. The officeemployment area should be directly connected to the retail center and could be connected via a multi-use trail to the residential areas as well if appropriate. The southern end of the corridor should maintain its focus on additional office medical and employment opportunities. South 14 Corridor Strategies Develop gateway urban design and streetscape enhancements Encourage a master-planned development between Pelham Medical Center and I-85 that incorporates a mixture of uses and is connected through an internal network of roadways and pedestrianbicycle paths Limit commercial development to the frontage of SC 14 on the east side in a walkable village- style format and encourage office employment facilities closer to I-85 Residential development should be encouraged east of Dillard Creek with pedestrianbicycle paths that connect to adjacent development Incorporate a greenway trail along Dillard Creek that connects to other area trails and Pelham Mill Park Foster additional employment growth in the area that complements the medical center and the access afforded by the interchange at I-85 Extend the frontage road along the south side of I-85 to Brockman- McClimon at Freeman Farm Road to provide a full local connection between SC 14 and Highway 101 Maintain appropriate buffers between commercial areas along SC 14 and future residential development to the east particularly along Abner Creek Road E Howell Road and Westmoreland Road Goals Improve the appearance and environment of the gateway from I-85 to Greer Foster a more significant employment area with supporting commercial Provide an appropriate transition from I-85 and SC 14 to future residential growth anticipated to the east and south CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 82 May 2015 Preliminary Project List 1. SR-14 Enhancements from Johns Road to Pelham Road 2. I-85 Frontage Road from SR-14 to Brockman McClimon 3. Trail Along Dillard Creek north of Abner Creek Road 1 2 3 83 G r e e r Community Master Plan The interchange of SC 101 at I-85 also is a major access point and development opportunity for the Greer area. The SC 101 corridor south of I-85 falls outside Greers city limits but its character and development potential clearly impacts Greer BMW and the surrounding community. The BMW manufacturing plant is located northwest of the interchange while large parcels of property slated for future regional retail occupy the northeast quadrant. With excellent access to I-85 current land uses mostly focus on industrial and logistics. With regional retail and future residential growth anticipated south of the interchange this land use is unlikely to remain low-intensity industrial and logistics over the long-term. The preferred growth strategy along the South 101 corridor focuses on regional retail and employment opportunities near I-85 and expanding residential development south of Abner Creek Road. While a single major regional retail development likely will draw additional retail and restaurants to the area community residents and stakeholders including BMW and local industry representatives want to ensure development in the area does not create traffic issues that undermine the areas economy and quality of life. The focus area places commercial retail development on one side of SC 14 and provides additional connectivity in the area. South 101 Corridor CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 84 May 2015 Susceptibility to Change Low Medium High Low Medium High 85 G r e e r Community Master Plan Retail on One Side The focus area limits regional retail to the east side of SC 14. This would allow the west side of SC 101 to become a valued location for office and employment. Separating the regional retail near the interstate and the neighborhood retail near Abner Creek Road will be important to maintaining traffic operations and character in the area. Street Connectivity The existing street network Plemmons Road Leonard Road and Duncan-Reidville Road is maximized by offering new connections with the area particularly over I-85. By providing a secondary roadway network east of SC 101 a regional commercial center can be fostered without duplicating the traffic challenges and gridlock exhibited by other major retail centers at interstate interchanges e.g. Woodruff Road. Corridor Standards In addition to fostering a secondary roadway network corridor standards should be established to improve the character of SC 101. Corridor standards should focus on appropriate sidewalk widths landscape buffers lighting and sitearchitectural design standards. Additional urban design gateway features may be considered at the interchange. South 101 Corridor Strategies Create a connection on the north side of I-85 from 101 to Duncan- Reidville Road Add a local crossing over I-85 northeast of 101 Create a local connection south of I-85 and east of 101 between Plemmons Road and Rogers Bridge Road Develop gateway urban design and streetscape enhancements for 101 Encourage employment on the west side of 101 Establish a buffer between regional development and future residential development to the west south and east CHAPTER3-FocusAreas 86 May 2015 Preliminary Project List 4. SR-101 Access Management and Corridor Enhancements 3. New Road SR-101 to SR-62 Plemmons Road North Connection and Bridge over I-85 2. New Road from Plemmons South to SR-63 1 2 3 4 Framework Plans 4 Introduction Transportation Parks and Open Space Arts and Culture 89 G r e e r Community Master Plan Introduction Two primary elements define a community its people and its places. These two elements are held together through a system of community features and local heritage. Left unchecked these systems can become so specialized that they evolve beyond their initial purpose. For this reason it is important for the community master plan to offer a framework for how these systems will interact and ensure they are positioned to meet the changing needs of the community. The following chapter provides specific strategies for three of the most important community features Transportation Parks and Open Space Arts and Culture Combined these strategies better position the city for imminent growth without compromising all that is uniquely Greer. CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 90 May 2015 Transportation 91 G r e e r Community Master Plan Transportation Greers transportation system offers unparalleled access upstate. The community enjoys access to I-85 the South Carolina Inland Port and Greenville- Spartanburg International Airport. Connections to these resources provide a strategic advantage to existing and potential employers. Both the city and the larger region have benefited from Greers well-positioned transportation network. A new vision for transportation in Greer is taking shape. The community spoke in favor of a balanced transportation system that Allows us to choose how we travel because our destinations are connected by a safe and efficient network of roads sidewalks and trails. Extends beyond our boundary with strategic links to a regional multimodal network. Moves people and goods without sacrificing the context of place. Can mature over time. The Transportation Framework outlines a multimodal approach based on the preferred growth strategy with additional focus on Greers critical corridors. It is expressed through three main components The street typology simplifies the relationship between land use context and transportation by blending the preferred growth strategy and traditional functional classification. This tool is an expression of the street typology. In effect it provides direction to decision makers based on land use considerations and transportation needs. Like the land use focus areas these corridors provide a higher level of detail to address multimodal needs and tie the transportation framework to the preferred growth strategy. Street Typology Strategic Corriodrs Street Design Priority Matrix CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlansCHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 92 May 2015 Transportation Framework Our community enjoys access to I-85 the South Carolina Inland Port and Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport. These features offer a strategic advantage to employers and the community. Over the past few decades we have seen an expansion of our roadway network. As we look to the future our focus shifts to improving mobility by creating choices. We will create opportunities for safe bicycling improve the walkability of our community and position ourselves to be transit ready. Its an approach that involves strategic transportation investments with an emphasis on quality design. Our roads connect our community. Our vision is to create a well-connected transportation network that offers structure to the preferred growth strategy support to our economic priorities and choice to the people who live work and play in our city. G r e e r Community Master Plan 93 In the past streets have been classified by state and federal departments of transportation based on operational characteristics and design elements. The classifications naturally focused on moving vehicles. The result was a network of streets focused on capacity with little consideration of walking and bicycling. The Greer Community Master Plan in response to the communitys voice seeks better balance between functional classification land use context and the competition among travel needs. This balance is expressed in a street typology that relates the destinations served by the road the character expressed in the preferred growth strategy to how people should travel on the roads by bike foot or vehicle. This typology is translated into a matrix that prioritizes a variety of street design elements. Street Typology The balance between functional classification land use context and the competition among travel needs is expressed in a Street Typology that relates the destinations served by the road to how people should travel on it. May 2015 CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 94 Functional classifications categorize roadways based on speeds vehicular capacities and relationships with adjacent existing and future land utilizations. Federal funding programs use roadway functional classification to help determine eligibility. While useful at the regional scale this classification lacks local detail and does not consider context. Federal Functional Classification Freeway Expressway Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector G r e e r Community Master Plan 95 Mixed-Use Commercial Residential Manufacturing and Logistics The building blocks of the preferred growth strategy is a set of community types that represent the different land use types and development patterns existing in or envisioned for Greer. The 10 community types have been consolidated into four categories of street types Mixed-Use Commercial Residential and Industrial. Consolidated Land Use Street Type Mixed-Use Commercial Residential Industrial Community Type Downtown Traditional Neighborhood Neighborhood Center Employment Center Regional Center Suburban Center Waterfront Living Rural Living Suburban Living Manufacturing and Logistics Greers Street Typology is tailored to the community with a single goal in mind offer consistency to how wethrough community initiative and regional partnershipcan plan design and construct multimodal streets that respond to context May 2015 CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 96 Mixed-Use Commercial Residential Manufacturing and Logistics To determine the street type planners and officials should determine the adjacent land use based on the consolidated community type categories. Is it mixed- use commercial residential or industrial Then they should reference the federal functional classification. Once the street type is determined they should reference the Street Design Priority Matrix. Street Typology Map Freeway Expressway Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector If we can develop and design streets so that they are wonderful fulfilling places to be community-building places attractive public places for all people of cities and neighborhoods then we will have successfully designed about one-third of the city directly and will have had an impact on the rest. -Allan Jacobs G r e e r Community Master Plan 97 PRIORITIES CHART FOR TRADE OFFS IN LIMITED RIGHT-OF-WAY The Street Design Priority Matrix establishes the priorities for tradeoffs we often debate when dealing with limited right-of-way. Once the street type is determined based on the land use context and street classification the matrix reveals priorities high medium and low for a variety of design characteristics. The matrix organizes these characteristics by street realm Travelway Pedestrian Zone and Other. Street Priority Matrix The Street Design Priority Matrix establishes the priorities for tradeoffs we often debate when dealing with limited right-of-way. Once the street type is determined based on the land use context and street classification the matrix reveals priorities high medium and low for a variety of design characteristics. The matrix organizes these characteristics by street realm Travelway Pedestrian Zone and Other. The Street Design Priority Matrix establishes the priorities for tradeoffs we often debate when dealing with limited right-of-way. Once the street type is determined based on the land use context and street classification the matrix reveals priorities high medium and low for a variety of design characteristics. The matrix organizes these characteristics by street realm Travelway Pedestrian Zone and Other. May 2015 CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 98 G r e e r Community Master Plan 99 Since 2000 the Greer area has added 22000 people with another 22000 likely to locate to the area by 2030. Answers to questions like Where should this new growth occur and What kinds of development is best for Greer were contemplated in the creation of the Greer Community Master Plan. Once answered and expressed through the preferred growth strategy the focus shifted to ensuring the community continues to prosper without losing what makes Greer unique. The impact of future growth will touch services and geographies throughout the area. However the communitys most vulnerable asset very well may be its major transportation corridors. In the future these streets will serve as the backdrop for strategies associated with transportation housing and economic development. A set of corridor profiles were designed to provide greater detail for the citys critical assets. Our ability to inject choice in transportationby building complete streets and finding context- sensitive solutions through development and redevelopmentis critical to our communitys health and economic vitality. It requires improving our citys road network integrating with regional transportation options enhancing walking and bicycle trails and positioning ourselves to be transit ready. The strategic corridors that follow respond to the unique street typology that links land use context with transportation decision- making. A profile is offered for each corridor to show existing conditions land use characteristics and design priorities. Connections along the corridors are emphasized and a typical street design is offered. The intent is to provide additional detail and demonstrate how these strategies can be applied more broadly throughout the planning area. Strategic Corridors May 2015 CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 100 South Buncombe Road SC 101 North SC 101 South SC 14 North SC 14 South Wade Hampton West Wade Hampton Central Wade Hampton East Strategic Corridors 101 G r e e r Community Master Plan 1 2 Street Typology Commercial Mixed-use Principal Arterial Functional Class 3.2 Miles Length Wade Hampton West 26000 Vehicles Per Day Traffic Volumes Safety Congestion Walk 1 2 3 Priorities Development Status Developed 49 Underdeveloped 28 Undeveloped 23 Current Plan Traditional Neighborhood 91 Suburban Living 8 Neighborhood Center 1 Preferred Growth Strategy Employment Center 37 Neighborhood Center 29 Traditional Neighborhood 25 Crash Summary Entire Corridor Total Crashes 472 Injury 128 Property Damage Only 91 Fatalities1 8 Most Predominant Rear End CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 102 May 2015 Potential Gateway Enhancements Potential Connectivity Points Potential Intersection Improvements Potential Trail Connections 103 G r e e r Community Master Plan 1 2 Street Typology Mixed-use Commercial Principal Arterial Functional Class 2.0 Miles Length Wade Hampton Central 28200 Vehicles Per Day Traffic Volumes Safety Appearance Bike 1 2 3 Priorities Development Status Developed 59 Underdeveloped 21 Undeveloped 20 Current Plan Traditional Neighborhood 96 Neighborhood Center 3 Suburban Center 2 Preferred Growth Strategy Traditional Neighborhood 65 Employment Center 27 Neighborhood Center 8 Crash Summary Entire Corridor Total Crashes 472 Injury 128 Property Damage Only 91 Fatalities1 8 Most Predominant Rear End CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 104 May 2015 Potential Gateway Enhancements Potential Connectivity Points Potential Intersection Improvements Potential Trail Connections 105 G r e e r Community Master Plan Collector Functional Class 2.8 Miles Length Wade Hampton East 23800 Vehicles Per Day Traffic Volumes Appearance Safety Transit 1 2 3 Priorities 1 2 Street Typology Commercial Mixed-use Residential3 Development Status Developed 44 Underdeveloped 32 Undeveloped 24 Current Plan Traditional Neighborhood 98 Neighborhood Center 2 Preferred Growth Strategy Employment Center 41 Suburban Center 16 Traditional Neighborhood 22 Crash Summary Entire Corridor Total Crashes 472 Injury 128 Property Damage Only 91 Fatalities1 8 Most Predominant Rear End CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 106 May 2015 Potential Gateway Enhancements Potential Connectivity Points Potential Intersection Improvements Potential Trail Connections 107 G r e e r Community Master Plan 1 2 Street Typology Mixed-use Commercial Collector Functional Class 2.3 Miles Length South Buncombe Road 21300 Vehicles Per Day Traffic Volumes Safety Transit Congestion 1 2 3 Priorities Development Status Developed 47 Underdeveloped 11 Undeveloped 42 Current Plan Suburban Center 51 Traditional Neighborhood 21 Employment Center 15 Preferred Growth Strategy Traditional Neighborhood 38 Neighborhood Center 37 Employment Center 25 Crash Summary Total Crashes 124 Injury 31 Property Damage Only 91 Fatalities1 2 Most Predominant Angle CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 108 May 2015 Potential Connectivity Points Potential Intersection Improvements Potential Trail Connections 109 G r e e r Community Master Plan Collector Functional Class 4.9 Miles Length SC 101 North 8100 Vehicles Per Day Traffic Volumes Safety Congestion Appearance 1 2 3 Priorities 1 2 Street Typology Residential Mixed-use Commercial3 Development Status Developed 31 Underdeveloped 38 Undeveloped 31 Current Plan Suburban Living 55 Suburban Center 32 Traditional Neighborhood 8 Preferred Growth Strategy Neighborhood Center 43 Traditional Neighborhood 24 Waterfront Living 19 Crash Summary Total Crashes 186 Injury 36 Property Damage Only 150 Fatalities1 2 Most Predominant Rear End CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 110 May 2015 Potential Gateway Enhancements Potential Connectivity Points Potential Intersection Improvements Potential Trail Connections 111 G r e e r Community Master Plan Development Status Developed 59 Underdeveloped 20 Undeveloped 21 Current Plan Suburban Living 44 Traditional Neighborhood 18 Suburban Center 17 Preferred Growth Strategy Suburban Center 46 Traditional Neighborhood 28 Neighborhood Center 24 1 2 Street Typology Residential Mixed-use Crash Summary Total Crashes 103 Injury 26 Property Damage Only 74 Fatalities1 3 Most Predominant Rear End Minor Arterial Principal Arterial Functional Class 3.4 Miles Length SC 14 North 13300 Vehicles Per Day Traffic Volumes Safety Congestion Bike 1 2 3 Priorities CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 112 May 2015 Segment A Segment B Potential Gateway Enhancements Potential Connectivity Points Potential Intersection Improvements Potential Trail Connections 113 G r e e r Community Master Plan 1 2 Street Typology Residential Commercial Minor Arterial Functional Class 3.2 Miles Length SC 101 South 19300 Vehicles Per Day Traffic Volumes Safety Appearance Congestion 1 2 3 Priorities Development Status Developed 25 Underdeveloped 34 Undeveloped 41 Current Plan Traditional Neighborhood 44 Regional Center 28 Suburban Living 16 Preferred Growth Strategy Suburban Living 61 Regional Center 28 Neighborhood Center 8 Crash Summary Total Crashes 110 Injury 26 Property Damage Only 83 Fatalities1 1 Most Predominant Angle CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 114 May 2015 Segment A Segment B Potential Connectivity Points Potential Intersection Improvements Potential Trail Connections 115 G r e e r Community Master Plan Principal Arterial Functional Class 4.8 Miles Length SC 14 South 25400 Vehicles Per Day Traffic Volumes Appearance Transit Safety 1 2 3 Priorities 1 2 Street Typology Commercial Mixed-use Residential3 Crash Summary Total Crashes 193 Injury 54 Property Damage Only 139 Fatalities1 0 Most Predominant Rear End Development Status Developed 70 Underdeveloped 7 Undeveloped 23 Current Plan Neighborhood Center 46 Suburban Living 23 Suburban Center 11 Preferred Growth Strategy Employment Center 25 Neighborhood Center 24 Suburban Living 21 CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 116 May 2015 Potential Connectivity Points Potential Intersection Improvements Potential Trail Connections 117 G r e e r Community Master Plan Completed in 2008 Greer City Park offers diverse recreational opportunities within steps of downtown. It also is the flagship facility for the citys system of parks and open space. The 2009 City of Greer Parks and Recreation Strategic Master Plan outlines facilities programs and strategies that build on the legacy of the current system. In doing so that plan acknowledges what the Greer Community Master Plan reinforcesour communitys parks and open spaces are an inherent part of our identity and an asset to be leveraged. The Parks and Open Space Framework focuses on the need to preserve and enhance parks and open spaces of all sizes and functions. The character types the building blocks of the preferred growth strategyare embedded with parks of all scales. Therefore the critical need is to identify the streets and greenways that connect the community with existing and future parks. Parks and Open Space City Park is a great addition to Greer. Not only does it provide a space for outdoor community events but also a place to walk during lunch or bring the kids after school. The park is not only beautiful but also safe. Parks like Greer City Park help make Greer a place I would like to live. Victor Heights Community Park Wards Creek Community Park Greentown Park B.P. Edwards Park Greer City Park Greer Municipal Complex Event Center Horace McKowan Jr. Center Greer City Gym and Ballfield Veterans Park Stevens Field Country Club Road ParkSports Complex Tryon Park RecreationTennis Academy Needmore Recreation Center and Park Greer City Stadium Springwood Community Park Turner Park Century Park Suber Road Soccer Complex Davenport Ballfield 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 - Online Comment Greer Community Master Plan CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 118 May 2015 G r e e r Community Master Plan 119 Parks and Open Space Framework Our communitys desire to live an active lifestyle is reinforced through the provision of quality spaces to gather recreate and enjoy the outdoors. We know that future investors and residents will be attracted by more than our geography. They will be influenced by our people as well as the natural and built environment. The Greer Community Master Plan envisions an interconnected system of parks open space trails and recreation facilities. For this reason we will continue to invest in ways that Promote healthy communities through active lifestyles Create premier facilities that attract families millennials retirees and new business Give people a reason to stay Allow parks open space and trails to become the connective fabric between important places Quality of Life The Council recognizes that an enhanced quality of life is essential to attract visitors and residents to the city. To that end the Council supports programs services and activities that enhance recreation facilities and amenities and provide the community with a sense of place that defines Greer as a great place to live work and play. Strategic Initiative 2013 Greer Strategic Plan May 2015 CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 120 Destination Potential Trail Connections Potential Pedestrian Improvement 121 G r e e r Community Master Plan Arts and Culture The town of Greer was chartered in 1876 only three years after the railroad gave rise to a speculative development in eastern Greenville County. The communitys rich heritage grew from there giving rise to a historic downtown and collection of former mill villages. Today arts and culture contribute to the communitys quality of life and help define what it means to be uniquely Greer. The community boasts a host of facilities programs performances exhibits and events that bring the community together and contribute to the local economy. The Arts and Culture Framework builds on the goals of the citys 2010 Comprehensive Plan by Promoting the historical aspects of the Greer Community Promoting festivals and events downtown and through land use design and transportation strategies making those events more attractive and viable Supporting the mission of the Greer Heritage Museum Promoting historic preservation Opportunities for Facilities Opportunities for Programs Creation of a Public Art Commission The framework is expressed through three main components CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 122 May 2015 Existing Facilities Cannon Centre Wall Gallery at Greer City Hall Greer City Hall Event Space Greer Heritage Museum Greer City Park and Amphitheater J. Harley Bonds Center Downtown Festivals and Concerts Existing Programs Greer Childrens Theatre at Cannon Centre and J. Harley Bonds Centre 4 plays per year Wall Gallery at Greer City Hall 3 shows per year rotating exhibits Foothills Philharmonic at Cannon Centre and J. Harley Bonds Centre 6 times per year Tunes in the Park at Greer City Park Art Dance Drama Classes at Cannon Centre and Tryon Street Recreation Building Summer Arts Camp and Performances at Cannon Centre and Tryon Street Story Teller Series at Cannon Centre International Festival at Greer City Park Arts Programs e.g. Dance Workshops Comedy Nights and Music Events at Cannon Centre Dr. MLK Jr. Day of Celebration at Greer City Hall G r e e r Community Master Plan 123 Arts and Culture Framework Highlighting what we are and what we value is part of what makes our community different. These distinctions contribute to our communitys character. They offer a quality environment for our residents and an experience that we are proud to share with visitors and those who will choose to invest in Greer. Promoting our arts and our culture plays a role in defining our community character. For this reason we will continue to invest in ways that Enhance things uniquely Greer Immerse the community in the arts Use our history to shape our future May 2015 CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 124 G r e e r Community Master Plan 125 Opportunities Opportunities for Facilities Performing Arts Facility Theater with Fly Stage and Orchestra Pit Symphonies Choruses Dance and Performances Art Gallery Arts District Re-purpose industrialwarehouse buildings along railroad tracks from Main Street to Poinsett Street Farmers Market Additional Parking for Greer Station Public Art along Pedestrian Pathways Opportunities for Programs Establish a Public Art Commission Expand Location and Venues to Various Locations within the City Expand Hours for Greer Heritage Museum and Scheduled Programs for Community Groups Develop a Sculpture Garden Interactive Arts Playground Temporary Interactive Public Art May 2015 CHAPTER4-FrameworkPlans 126 Public Art Commission Responsibilities Initial Steps A legacy of the Greer Community Master Plan should be the creation of a Public Art Commission. This group of five artists designers and enthusiasts should form a voice for the Arts in Greer. Determine member selection criteria and procedures Establish by-laws define officers and responsibilities city liaison meeting procedures voting rules of order etc. Develop a Public Art Master Plan identify a theme specific locations for art and educational programs Create and maintain an artists registry Identify funding e.g. percent of Sunday alcohol sales new development costs etc. Develop annual budget track new projects and annual maintenance Create mechanism for leveraging public funds with private investments for public art program Inventory existing public art Create websiteapp to enhance community knowledge of and access to public art Develop art selection criteria Confirm City of Greer is legal ownership of all public art purchase and maintain adequate insurance for each piece of art 5Action Plan Introduction Strategy Board High Priority Actions Path to Success 129 G r e e r Community Master Plan Introduction Our community has a history of charting its future through collaboration and hard work. Continued success will be achieved not through the leadership of a specific group or individual but through time-tested partnerships. While recognizing the success of existing partnerships we acknowledge new partnerships will play an important role in achieving our community aspirations. The Greer Community Master Plan creates a common vision to coordinate our efforts and focus on shared priorities. Working together we can attract quality growth enhance what is uniquely Greer and promote connections to our region. But we are not starting from scratch. Evidence of our success is all around us The year 2030 will be no different as the goals of this plan come to fruition. A revitalized downtown Parks open spaces and gathering places that are the envy of many communities of comparable size Enhanced commercial and industrial development Quality residential development The emergence of a community that is a key partner in the strength of the upstate economy CHAPTER5-EnvisioningSuccess 130 May 2015 The following pages present a strategy board using terminology from the original 1999 plan for Greer. The master plan organizes an actionable strategy around seven key themes A goal statement supports each of the themes. This goal statement is the aspiration of the theme and provides a way to test specific action items. Action items will be implemented in three time horizons Immediate 2015-2020 Mid-term 2021- 2025 and Longer-term 2026-2030. The action items will help channel the energy of implementation partners and provide a method of evaluating our progress over time. Its important to note that some Action Items directly relate to several themes and the document is dynamic. Unforeseen opportunities will arise over the course of this plan and some items identified may change based on new circumstances. These situations in no way compromise the action plan but strengthen it as a living document for our community. The Strategy Board is deliberately designed to allow Greer to chart our progress over time. As Action Items are completed they can be moved to a successes column new initiatives can be easily incorporated and changing circumstances can account for actions that occur quicker or slower than originally indicated. Strategy Board Promoting a preferred growth strategy through policy Promoting a preferred growth strategy through partnerships Expanding the traditional downtown Enhancing gateways and wayfinding Promoting mobility Promoting Arts culture and history Connecting the community with recreation and trails 2015-2020 Recognizing that ongoing growth is essential to Greers success the community will promote the preferred growth strategy through sound policies and codes. Memoralize the preferred growth strategy in the Comprehensive Plan Update Update the Citys development code to encourage selective redevelopment on North Main Street limit building setbacks and require parking to the rear or side of buildings Organize the Citys land use plan around a set of place type categories inspired by the Community Types used here Amend the Water and Sewer Master Plan to reflect the limits and service expectations of the preferred growth strategy Explore hybrid form-based or traditional zoning to accommodate mixed use development Focus new development particularly local retail and restaurants between Trade Street E. Poinsett Street and City Park Review development code requirements for the Arts District and consider allowing greater flexibility for uses and building design Develop architectural and site design standards for Wade Hampton Boulevard activity nodes Develop corridor standards for the South SC 14 corridor sidewalk landscape and sitearchitectural design standards for new development Limit commercial development to one side likely the east side of SC 101 G r e e r Community Master Plan 131 Promoting a Preferred Growth Strategy through Policy 2021-2025 2026-2030 Re-evaluate the Comprehensive Plan Re-evaluate the place types for any necessary revisions Re-evaluate the updated development Code for necessary revisions Monitor the expansion of water and sewer and support logical expansion incrementally and through CIP Continue to monitor redevelopment activity and adjust development codes as appropriate Develop corridor standards for the South SC 101 corridor sidewalk landscape and sitearchitectural design standards for new development Update the Comprehensive Plan Monitor the effectiveness of place type categories Monitor the effectiveness of the updated development code and amend as necessary Monitor the expansion of water and sewer and support logical expansion incrementally and through CIP May 2015 CHAPTER5-EnvisioningSuccess 132 2015-2020 Greer will continue its history of partnerships with a focus on promoting the preferred growth strategy created by the community and championed by its stakeholders. Identify potential locations for mixed- use development along Wade Hampton Boulevard and in downtown Focus new development particularly local retail and restaurants between Trade Street and E. Poinsett Street and City Park Leverage the Greer Development Corporation GDC to begin creating a land bank for future publicprivate partnerships Cultivate private sector partners to implement mixed-use development Promote quality design that integrates neighborhood centers see Preferred Growth Strategy with surrounding residential neighborhoods Recruit market and retain employment in the targeted employment center locations illustrated in the preferred growth strategy Recruit market and retain manufacturing and logistics locations illustrated in the preferred growth strategy Strengthen the connection to traditional neighborhoods see preferred growth strategy surrounding downtown Partner with other local organizations to acquire and construct a community facility on the former Victor Mill site Encourage master plan development of vacant property on the east side of SC 14 between I-85 and Pelham Medical Center G r e e r Community Master Plan 133 Promoting a Preferred Growth Strategy through Partnerships 2021-2025 2026-2030 Promote the creation of a well-planned multi-use regional center see Preferred Growth Strategy at the interchange of I-85 and SC 101 Complete first mixed-use development project Redevelop andor or improve J. Harley Bonds Career Center to front North Main Street andor provide green space between the building and North Main Street Expand downtown development focus to filling gaps between Greer Station and adjacent districts Continue infill development of vacant sites in downtown and redevelopment of existing buildings Recruit market and retain employment in the targeted employment center locations illustrated in the preferred growth strategy Recruit market and retain manufacturing and logistics locations illustrated in the preferred growth strategy Consider constructing an arts or cultural facility along Cannon Street Consider public improvements associated with the arts or cultural facility along Cannon Street Recruit market and retain employment in the targeted employment center locations illustrated in the preferred growth strategy Recruit market and retain manufacturing and logistics locations illustrated in the preferred growth strategy May 2015 CHAPTER5-EnvisioningSuccess 134 2015-2020 Greers downtown will grow beyond the traditional boundaries thought of as the commercial core to embrace Main Street as it reaches Wade Hampton and transition to adjacent neighborhoods. Rezone appropriate areas around downtown for mixed-use development in keeping with existing neighborhood context Create design guidelines for downtown and surrounding neighborhoods Empower the Architectural Review Board ARB to implement design guidelines Pursue and potentially incentivize new employment and residential development in and adjacent to Greer Station Prepare a detailed streetscape plan for North Main Street from Poinsett Street to Wade Hampton Boulevard Meet with property owners to explore future plans for development Promote the special tax assessment and vacant building law to encourage redevelopment Implement community market between CSX and Norfolk Southern Line in the Arts District G r e e r Community Master Plan 135 Expanding the Traditional Downtown 2021-2025 2026-2030 Complete a mixed-use redevelopment along the North Main Street Corridor Begin placing power lines underground in downtown Reinstate faade improvement grants for targeted areas such as the Arts District Create road connection through the Arts District aligning with Pennsylvania Avenue and carrying through to SC 101 Complete infill development projects downtown as identified in the illustrated plan Continue placing power lines underground along corridors with a focus on Main Street and Poinsett Street May 2015 CHAPTER5-EnvisioningSuccess 136 2015-2020 As the heart of the dynamic region Greers gateways and corridors will be the model for quality development landscaping and efficient multimodal transportation in upstate South Carolina. Work with donors to adopt gateways in Greer Implement downtown gateway at the intersection of Poinsett Street and Wade Hampton Boulevard Implement downtown gateway at the intersection of North Main Street and Wade Hampton Boulevard Implement city gateway at Verne Smith Parkway and Wade Hampton Boulevard Implement city gateway at Old Rutherford Road and Wade Hampton Boulevard Lobby SCDOT for Greer Next Three Exits sign Improve the intersection of Poinsett Street Cannon Street and Depot Street with enhanced paving Implement City Gateway landscaping at SC 101 and Interstate 85 Implement City Gateway landscaping at SC 14 and I-85 G r e e r Community Master Plan 137 Enhancing Gateways and Wayfinding 2021-2025 2026-2030 Construct streetscape enhancements including potential roadway reconfiguration for Victoria Street and along Randall Street between Poinsett Street and South Main Street Landscape along SC 14 Landscape along SC 101 Design and construct Wade Hampton corridor landscape and sidewalk standards from Brannon Drive to Middleton Way Construct Poinsett Street gateway and pedestrianbicycle enhancements to connect to Greer Station Complete infill development projects as identified in the illustrated plan Continue placing power lines underground along corridors with a focus on Main Street and Poinsett Street May 2015 CHAPTER5-EnvisioningSuccess 138 2015-2020 Greer will recognize the economic benefits enhanced quality of life and improved sense of place through strategic transportation investments that promote the movement of people and goods within the city. Complete the Downtown Bicycling and Walking Plan including the identification of priority projects and agencies responsible for implementation Promote context-sensitive design with an emphasis on the design concepts expressed for the strategic corridors Incorporate expectations for the strategic corridors in the Long Range Transportation Plan Update street design standards in the citys development code Extend Trade Street sidewalk and landscape enhancements south to Pelham Street including artistic treatments to railroad crossings Identify park and ride locations along Wade Hampton Boulevard Expand Greenlink service in Greer Promote development of a secondary roadway network to provide alternative transportation routes and access to SC 101 G r e e r Community Master Plan 139 Promoting Mobility 2021-2025 2026-2030 Monitor and implement projects in accordance with the Downtown Bicycling and Walking Plan Construct North Main Street corridor improvements roadway reconfiguration and bicycle sidewalk landscape and lighting enhancement Review and revise transportation recommendations during required updates to the Long Range Transportation Plan Continue to expand Greenlink service Resolve intersection of Taylors Road SC 290 and SC 101 Expand road network at SC 101 and I-85 to allow continued growth and development Construct Pointsett Street pedestrian bicycle enhancements to connect residential areas to Greer Station Construct roadway through the Arts District from South Main Street to East Point Street Extend sidewalklandscape enhancements along Pelham Street to and through adjacent residential neighborhoods Construct multi-use trail loop connecting new community facility Stevens Field Veterans Park Victor Park and downtown Construct South SC 14 improvements roadway sidewalk and landscaping Encourage a roadway connection on the north side of I-85 from SC 101 to Victor Hill andor Duncan Reidville Road Monitor and implement pedestrian projects in accordance with the Downtown Bicycling and Walking Plan Review and revise transportation recommendations during required updates to the Long Range Transportation Plan Continue to expand Greenlink service in Greer with consideration for future bus rapid transit Explore road improvements along SC 290 and SC 101 north of Wade Hampton Boulevard Enhance Street Mark Road from SC 290 to Wade Hampton Boulevard Improve Old Rutherford Rd from SC 290 to Wade Hampton Blvd. Construct enhancements to South Line Street potential roadway configuration lighting sidewalks and landscaping Design and construct multi-use trail along Chick Springs to Greer Station Construct intersection improvement at Buncombe Road and Taylor Road potential roundabout Extend East Phillips Roadfrontage road south of I-85 to Brockman McClimon Road Construct multi-use trail along Dillard Creek Construct roadway across I-85 Consider a new roadway connection east of SC 101 between Plemmons Road and Rogers Bridge Road May 2015 CHAPTER5-EnvisioningSuccess 140 2015-2020 Greer will celebrate its rich history embrace its mixture of cultures and celebrate the Arts in the community. Establish a Public Art Commission Develop a Public Art Master Plan inventory funding leveraging publicprivate partnerships Establish Arts District enhancement fund to incentivize private building rehabilitation and redevelopment activity Create and maintain an artists registry Create an Arts District south of the Norfolk Southern rail line in downtown Initiate feasibility of a cultural facility in downtown to stimulate economic development G r e e r Community Master Plan 141 Promoting the Arts Culture and Historty 2021-2025 2026-2030 Explore a housing program to recruit artists and creative professionals to downtown neighborhoods Create technology-based interpretation of historic and art sites in Greer Implement phase one of a cultural facility per findings of the feasibility study Review effectiveness of Arts District enhancement fund and make adjustments as necessary Implement final phases of cultural facility in downtown Build an artstechnology magnet school in the Arts District May 2015 CHAPTER5-EnvisioningSuccess 142 2015-2020 Parks trails and recreational amenities will define Greer as a place connected through green space welcoming to families and rich with diverse activities. Develop a Trails Master Plan for Greer Acquire the Victor Mill property for future park use Develop Victor Mill Park Master Plan G r e e r Community Master Plan 143 Connecting the Community with Recreation and Trails 2021-2025 2026-2030 Implement Victor Mill Park Master Plan Plan recreationaquatic center Connect Victor Park Stevens Field and Victor Mill site with a multi-use trail Develop trail along Brushy Creek Explore connection from Greer to the Swamp Rabbit Trail Explore trail connection from East Riverside Park to Greer Memorial Century B Park and downtown Complete recreationaquatic center Extend Brushy Creek trail to Pelham Park at SC 14 and Pelham Road Implement connection from Greer to the Swamp Rabbit Trail Construct trail to Tyger River Park from Bass Pro Shop Construct trail from Verne Smith to Lake Robinson along Tyger River May 2015 CHAPTER5-EnvisioningSuccess 144 G r e e r Community Master Plan 145 High Priority Actions Certain action items identified in the Strategy Board immediately rise as high priority actions. Some are highly visible physical projects while others are policy changes or emerging partnerships that will reap benefits over the long term. The following high priority actions are recommended Memoralize the Preferred Growth Strategy in the Citys Comprehensive Plan Update. The Comprehensive Plan is Greers planning tool to inform zoning decisions and other changes necessary to implement recommendations in this plan. Pursue and potentially incentivize new employment and residential development in and adjacent to Greer Station. The growth of downtown is dependent on the health of adjacent neighborhoods and employment centers. Greer has a significant opportunity to market neighborhoods and employment opportunities close to its vibrant and successful downtown. Implement Gateway Improvements. Currently Greer has only one significant gateway the entry to downtown along Main Street. Greer has the opportunity to announce to visitors where the community begins and where it transitions into downtown through strategic gateway enhancements. Complete the Pedestrian Master Plan sponsored by the MPO. This plan should provide specific guidance for enhancing the pedestrian experience in Greer by inventorying projects identifying dedicated funding and seeking partnerships for implementation. Establish a Public Art Commission and Develop a Public Art Master Plan. The Public Art Commission and Public Art Master Plan should inventory existing public art identify potential funding partners and leverage publicprivate partnerships to create more art in the City of Greer. Acquire Victor Mill and develop a plan for Victor Mill Park. This mill is a legacy for Greer and the current site detracts from the community. It offers a substantial opportunity to transition from an eyesore to a significant asset. May 2015 CHAPTER5-EnvisioningSuccess 146 G r e e r Community Master Plan 147 Path to Success Ensuring success requires focus leadership and resources. These three traits benefit from deliberate structure. When considering how to take action our community should consider the following Identify a Champion Each action item will require a championsomeone who owns the responsibility for achieving the stated goal. These champions should be empowered with the ability to mobilize partners and align resources specific to the actions needs. Greer should assign each action item in the strategy board with an appropriate champion. Measure Progress The best way to maintain momentum is to monitor progress on a regular basis. Regular status reports should identify completed task ongoing work and future programming as well as highlight where progress is being made and tasks that require more attention. The strategy board provides a tool to evaluate progress with annual reports to check progress on action items and consistency with the Greer Community Master Plans vision and goals. Embrace Accountability We should expect to hold each other accountable. The action plan will not be achieved overnight. Some tasks will come easy and will be achieved in short order. Other tasks will be a challenge take more time and require persistence and flexibility. Failure to achieve a certain task in the timeframe reflected should not be viewed as a failure but rather an acknowledgment that we need to reassess our focus leadership and resources. Effective partnerships will ensure that our challenges become opportunities and our ongoing success becomes our legacy for the future of Greer. 148 Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success. Henry Ford plangreer.com cityofgreer.org pftgreer.com