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Page 1 of 1 G r e e r Community Master Plan 71 Image Spartanburg Public Library Historical Digital Collections William Lynch Postcard Collection 1910-1919 Victor Mill built in the 1890s was one of four major textile plants in the greater GreenvilleSpartanburg area. In the 1920s Victor Mill served as a model for successful mill communities. Small villages were created as homes churches schools and recreational facilities were built to support plant workers and their families. With more than 200 employees working at the plant Victor Mill shaped much of downtown Greers growth and development. As the 20th century progressed more foreign cloth came into the United States leading to the modernization of textile technology. Victor Mill closed in 2001 and the structure was ravaged by fire in 2004. After sitting partially demolished until 2008 the Environmental Protection Agency conducted a site contamination study. In 2011 Spartanburg County formally took ownership of the site and though the site has been cleaned-up it remains vacant. Today the 20-acre site a half- mile from downtown Greer technically resides in Spartanburg Countyan island within the city limits of Greer. While the community desires to redevelop the Victor Mill site limited potential uses for the large site exist. Due to limited accessibility a major office or commercial retail development on the site is unlikely. Environmental concerns make the site unsuitable for single-family residential development. And while multi-family development is a possibility market demand does not exist and a standalone multi- family development would not be the necessary catalyst for the surrounding neighborhood. Victor Mill Community Center The redevelopment of Victor Mill should enhance surrounding neighborhoods and support the overarching goal of enhancing downtown. As a result the best use of the property would be as a community recreation facility. Access to recreation facilities and fields has been voiced as a community desire throughout the Greer Community Master Plan process. A community recreation facility on the Victor Mill site could consolidate nearby parks Stevens Field Veterans Park and Victor Park into a single more significant recreational anchor for the city. Victor Mill Sources Trevor Anderson GoUpstate.com Victor Mill Its a blight on Spartanburg County published Tuesday October 21 2008. httpwww.goupstate.com article20081021NEWS810210340p2tcpg History 2009-2015 The Greenville Textile Heritage Society. Greenville South Carolina - httpscmillhills.commillsmonaghanhistory